DIY If I can do it so can you

Yep, according to pvc:

MiniPro and USB HiPro can do pretty much the same thing, but are different. USB HiPro is a little faster according to one limited test that was mentioned on the forums. The downside of the MiniPro/HiPro approach is the need for cables and adapters. They’re not all that easy to find–they’re moderately expensive and they are not standardized. Unless you’re picking a hearing aid that doesn’t work with NoahLink Wireless, I’d go with the NoahLink Wireless. One possible exception is if your hearing aid of choice requires hard wired connection for updates. I know Oticon Opn required hard wired connnection for updates–don’t know about OpnS. Whatever you get, be precise in the terms you use to order stuff. NoahLink is different than NoahLink Wireless. Flex Strip is different than programming pill. Phonak cables are different than other cables.

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All this is why I went with Phonak 10 years ago and stay with them.

If a person wants to do self programming these are the things to think about before buying anything. You have to have a plan. The aids are just about the last thing to buy.

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Agreed. I’m afraid I get frustrated with some who come here who have their new hearing aids and decide they want a smartphone app that will let them do everything the audiologist does.

Yes, I see it too.
Dusty said it well about reading and searching this forum to great lengths before starting self programming. As I learn more about the one and only programming software I use, Phonak, I feel for audiologist who have to understand 2,3 or more name brand softwares. The more I learn the more I realize I don’t know.

I agree, and suspect the reason some folks are pleased with their aids, and others disappointed, is not so much the brand of the aids, but how well the audiologist understands the software. It must be difficult trying to be proficient on multiple programs.

In my case I made the decision to go with Phonak, and will stay with them hoping to become better at using the Target software over time. You are correct that the longer I am at it the more I realize how much I still have to learn. I know I am getting better at it, because I can wear the aids and ear molds all day without discomfort, hearing things clearly around me, and go for hours forgetting they are in my ears. That’s success.

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Bob, if I knew the answers to your questions I would be glad to reply but I don’t.
I think you will have much better luck posting your questions in one of the other DIY sections of this forum where the self-programmers lurk and know all this stuff. For example, do a search under the names of the programming equipment you have.

This is a good discussion so I will butt in.
These are my rechargeable hearing aids. Bluetooth A2DP is enabled on both aids. It was sheer luck that I bought these about 5 years ago because Bluetooth connection to my Samsung phone, Windows 10 computer, and ALead wireless mic is essential. The foam earbuds are my choice to replace the domes supplied with the aids. Bluetooth connection is perfect. After turning on my phone in the morning I hear “connected” in my right ear. When my computer turns on I hear “connected” in my left ear. When I play cards with my wife in the afternoon, I turn on the ALead mic and hear “connected” in my left ear.


I cannot hear without them and I cannot use a phone without them.
Newer, more expensive aids may improve speech clarity. I tried the COSTCO ReSound Preza 861 and speech clarity was good but Bluetooth was a flop. The audiologist must not have understood my requirements.

This is about all the programming I can do.

Does anyone have a suggestion for another hearing aid that might have better speech clarity?

I would think most modern hearing aids would be better for speech clarity.

It sounds like you have 3 Bluetooth devices that are important to you, even 4 if you add the TV for example.That shouldn’t be a problem with the right devices for whichever hearing aids you decide to go with. The trick is to understand what a particular set of aids need to do that. It can be different pending on the type phone you have. iPhones have more choices at this time but android phones will work with the new Phonak aids and the Costco KS9 aids.

As an example my Phonak Audeo B90 aids will connect to the TV using a TV Connector streaming to an intermediate device I hang around my neck called the Compilot. The Compilot communicates with my aids. It also is used to change volume or programs, pretty handy. I also have a device called a Remote Mic. It can be placed anywhere to pick up sounds I want to be streamed into both ears using the Compilot.

Different name brand aids use different devices to do the above mentioned things.

Thanks for the reply. I guess I am being picky but I would rather not have something hanging around my neck to enable the use of my Android phone. My TV has no audio output so I just use CC.
I will probably wait a few more years to see how things develop.

As mentioned, the new Phonak Marvel line of aids will connect to your android phone without an intermediate device.(Neck thing) Members use the TV connector to connect to the computer or TV with great results. This line of aids also has a remote device called a Partner Mic that could be used for your card playing.

If you were to move to an iPhone there are many more choices.

Wow! Your unaided hearing is a lot worse than mine.

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