Phonak Virto-B Titanium Experience?

Hi all,

I’m currently going through the process of getting new hearing aids and would prefer to get CIC/IIC so the aids are not visible (primarily as I don’t have long hair to hide the RIC aids).

I like the Phonak Virto-B Titanium aids due to the marketing of stronger shell and larger vent, however my audiologist (Boots) has told me people have recently returned these as they do not hold well in the ear and advised to try the Virto-B (non-Titanium) instead.

I would like to know if anyone would have any experience of using the Phonak Virto-B Titanium and offer and advice on how well or not they’ve got on with these aids.

Many thanks.

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You don’t need hair.

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If you post your audiogram, go to your icon - click on blank audiogram - enter data, you’ll receive better advice.

There are pro & cons for canal aids vs RIC and the RIC can be less noticeable than some canal aid. It is good to research your options with an audiologist you trust.

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I can notice CICs from across the road but I struggle to notice RICs. RICs are way less noticeable.

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My wife was fitted with the B90 Titanium - she returned them last week and will be trying the Oticon OPN1 MiniRITE (which I have and like.) Her complaint was that the primary reason she got HAs was to help her understand speech in noisy environments, but what the Phonaks did instead was drop all the higher frequencies - she called it “going bassy” - and she couldn’t understand a thing. She also said that under normal circumstances, everything sounded as if it were in a wind tunnel, and hated that the only control option required use of a magnetic wand.

Our audiologist tried adjusting settings, but nothing worked.

The original choice of the Titaniums was due to her small ears. Initially she is getting domes rather than a mold for the Oticon - that may change later if they work for her.

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All,

Many thanks for your replies. I’ve hopefully been able to add my audiogram now.

I appreciate not needing hair but as a new hearing aid wearer the idea of having visible hearing aids is something I’ve not yet to used to, although that is not to say I’ve ruled it out.

I am initially looking at ‘invisible’ aids and want to try the IIC/CIC style first to see how I get on with them. I’m half expecting not to like them (possible occlusion) and will then try a RIC style although I wanted to rule out the IIC/CIC first rather than wondering what they would be like.

The audiologist has suggested the Phonak Virto-B (non-Titanium) over the Titanium model as some customers have returned their Titanium due to poor fit. I would like to know if anyone else has any experience and would recommend one over the other.

Many thanks.

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I have the Virto V70, which is an ITC aid, and I was able to fully empathise with your post. The “going bassy” as you call it happens with me too on the automatic setting, and it drives me absolutely crazy - it is the sound of silence. In order for me to understand anything I had to get the audiologist to boost the volume by about 10 decibels. Even then, I am more inclined to switch the hearing aid to the quiet situations mode - where there is more bass.

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My wife got her OPN1s today and she is very happy with both the sound and the feel of it in her ear, (She has vented domes, I have a custom mold.)

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I just received my new Phonak Virto B Titanium. First thing I noticed was that they are bigger and fit tighter than my Phonak Virto Q90 IIC that I got 3 years ago. I had them in today for 2 hours. They started to hurt. Put my old ones back in.
The sound does seem different. Not sure if the sound is better or not yet.
My hearing test is almost a flat line 45

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It’s Deja Vu all over again :face_with_raised_eyebrow:

I have been wearing the Phonak B Titanium’s for a little over a month now. My previous HA’s were the Phonak Virto Q90 IIC’s from a couple of years ago. My older pair fit really well and I felt like I was hearing good with them, but I am fortunate to have insurance which allows a new pair every two years. I decided to try the Titanium’s since I was happy with Phonak. I liked the fit and the feedback control of the Virto Q90’s over my previous Starkey Sound Lens. With the Starkey, I had a lot of feedback issues when eating or yawning (jaw opening). My audio requested the same molds of the Virto Q90’s. My audie was able to adjust them to my prescription (see my audiogram) and they fit like a glove. With the new titanium’s I am hearing some things better, some for the first time in long time (a fan on my computer hissing, sounds when typing on my iPhone, a cd spinning in the drive, etc), though it has taken some time to get used to more wind noise and road noise when riding in a car. I think it just takes my brain some time to get accustom to the changes. After a month I can now focus more on speech in the car and listening to the radio better than the first weeks . Overall, I would say my hearing improved approximately 10% with the titanium’s. My audie programed them so every touch of the button increased the volume 2db up to 10db the next adjustment put them back in normal mode. So far I have not had to increase the volume in any circumstance, but it’s nice to know the option is there. Good luck with your HA’s.

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GPZ4189: I’m interested in your IIC experience. I was under the impression that IIC was recommended for those with a flat audiogram. Apparently IIC does not perform well for those with high frequency loss. Hence, they do not perform well in the area of speech recognition. I have been wearing Phonak RIC for 8 years and desire to upgrade + improve my speech recognition. Here is the source that implies IIC is not recommended for high frequency loss. Invisible hearing aids, what’s available and from who in 2018?
I note that your have high frequency loss is similar to mine. Is your experience regarding speech recognition with the Virto-B contrary to my reading source? Just wondering if I should consider or try IIC instead of my RIC.

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IIC must use smaller batteries; hence less processing and features. They often have a single mic. They can’t serve more profound loss as well. They work best for those with a simple loss and a good WRS. They are more prone to needing repair.

In categories it goes from lower loss to higher:
Canal
RIC
BTE

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You might be noticing ITE. CIC and mCIC are so deep in the canal as to be nearly invisible.

OP - a stronger shell is probably not necessary, I never had any shell issues in all my years wearing various ITE aid configurations. I will say, RIC is not that noticeable, and the multiple microphones over the CIC kinds do make a big difference. However, if you are embarrassed by an aid, then CIC is a solution. They are also better protected from wind noise, rain, and damage. They are better for very active people, and don’t have issues with clacking against glasses.

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That was not my experience with ITE styles.

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Hi Daniel,

I have been wearing IICs for over 4 years now. Fortunately for me my speech recognition is good in my left ear not so fortunate with the right ear, but overall I am able to hear and converse in most situations.

Even though your audiogram is similar to mine in the high frequency loss, I’m not sure if these Titanium HAs will work for you without trying them yourself. I don’t think my speech recognition improved any with the Titanium model over the acrylic, just some subtle sounds I mentioned in my previous post.

My Audie did have to work a little on the programming to get my DB level up and not have any feedback when holding the phone up to my ear or with certain jaw movements. There is also a certain level of occlusion you have to get used to. With the Titanium HAs, they came with a very small vent, this helps with feedback but enhances the occlusion, which I have become used to, especially when eating.

Good luck, if you have more questions or I did not answer something please feel free to get back with me.

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Thank you for the helpful feedback!

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