Low frequency hearing loss fitting - brand and earmold advice

resound
phonak
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#1

I have a mild hearing loss in both ears, mainly in the low frequencies and have found a lot of benefit from trialling Phonak Audeo Q50s. As I get ready to be fitted with my own pair, my audiologist has recommend either Phonak Audeo B70, Oticon OPN2 or OPN1, or Resound Linx 3D. I don’t know anything about hearing aids really, and am having difficulty finding any information that pertains to low frequencies. My audiologist seemed to think resound would be the best in terms of price and benefit, but I just read some very bad reviews and am nervous now. Does anyone have any experience as to which brands are most useful? I listen in noisy situations almost constantly, so that’s important. I like the connectivity of the resound though.

Finally, have people with low freq losses found that custom ear molds work better than domes? My audi recommends an open fit either way, but I’m curious if an ear mold would improve sound quality.


#2

Can you add your audiogram so it’s easier for people to help you?

Also, everyone hears differently. One HA might sound better to one person but the next person might hate how that one HA sounds.

You’re better of trialing the HAs.

Noise control will be better on the Phonak B70 then the Q50.


#3

Use closed domes.
Closed domes can also boost the low frequency (usually below 500HZ) sound pressure in the ear canal 20dB or more!


#4

If your worst loss is low frequency and you can use open domes, I would wonder about your loss. Open domes are for high frequency loss and designed to pass the lows in naturally. I’m concerned by that indicating you may not need aids.

Maybe if you tell us why you need aids we could have a better idea of how to answer.

As for the cheaper vs mid level models, it is about how well you do in noisy situations. I suspect you find the entry/cheaper versions adequate.


#5

You may have what is called Reverse Slope Hearing Loss (RSHL). Check this thread Introduction + Help


#6

I’m not sure I have a picture of my audiogram, but these are my threshholds:

250 Hz - R: 50 L:50
500Hz - R: 30 L: 40
750Hz - R: 35 L: 40
1000Hz - R: 40 L: 40
1500Hz - R: 30 L: 40
2000Hz - R: 20 L: 30
3000Hz - R: 20 L: 30
4000Hz - R: 10 L: 20
6000hz - R&L: 5
8000Hz - R&L: 0


#7

My loss is caused by otosclerosis, and I was having a lot of trouble hearing in lecture halls, and even more difficulty hearing in Mandarin, which I speak with my family and take in school. I was recommended trialling hearing aids with no promise of benefit, but I have found benefit in Mandarin especially. I am unsure now why she would fit me with open domes though. She told me that it let the high frequencies pass through so she didn’t need to amplify them as much.


#8

closed mould + directional fixed program+ max noise reduction and wind noise reduction and transient reduction will help some what gelps


#9

When you say “low frequency” what frequency range are you speaking of?

It seems that many aids don’t do squat for sounds below 500hz or else there is a gap between 50hz and 500hz, with some having a 250hz in there, too.

I’m looking for fine tuning control within that 50-500hz range. I’d love to see 10 bands of EQ correction in that area, since that it the range a singing voice and an acoustic guitar mostly live in.

Welcome to my world…


#10

Ask your fitter to switch the language choice to Chinese. It is more tonal and there are fittings for it. Have it placed on the 2nd or 3rd program so you can switch to it when appropriate.


#11

First, on custom ear molds vs. domes: It’s my experience and opinion that, except for very mild loss where domes are the obvious choice and very severe loss where molds are the obvious choice, this choice depends a lot on your perception and tolerance of a plugged up (or “in a diving bell” and hear my own voice too loud) perception vs. your tolerance for some occasional feedback (i.e., squealing). Obviously, open domes don’t result in much plugged up sensation but are most prone to feedback. Molds are the opposite. And non-vented domes are in between as are vented molds (if these are used anymore).

Others will be quick to point out that modern aids have feedback management (i.e., elimination) technology. That’s true, but this technology has limitations. I’ve used HAs with every one of the domes and molds I’ve listed. My preference is for vented domes (with my Oticon OPN1s, which have good but not perfect feedback management). I can tolerate occasional feedback, but I really don’t like any plugged up sensation. My loss (see audiogram) is worse than yours but different.

I suggest you work with your audiologist to first try open domes. If feedback bothers you, try closed domes. I’ll be surprised if you end up with molds.


#12

Second, on otosclerosis: I assume your hearing test included bone conduction. Is there a substantial gap between your bone conduction and total loss at some frequencies? And is this the main source of your otosclerosis diagnosis? Both ears? Have you had or considered stapedotomy or stapedectomy?

As someone who has otosclerosis and four stapedotomy operations, I think these questions are important, and the answers may affect your hearing aid strategy and choices.

Perhaps we should have a separate Hearing Tracker category such as “Otosclerosis, Stapedotomy, and Stapedectomy”. These are sort of diffused within the current category structure.


#13

tonal language falling in very low frequency i used this target so much gain in low then you can hear tonal but istorted and also more noise. (if more loss). if not you increase low wont hear. it will be better torestrict gain at low so do not use tonal prescription my suggetion. see just my audiogram for effect. at least not working for me. other can try if working


#14

There is a Facebook group called “Reverse Slope Hearing Loss (new)” that I have found helpful. Apparently, many fitters don’t have much experience with low frequency loss, and that often leads to poor results with hearing aids. I am trying to educate myself so that I can hopefully work better with a fitter when I go to get aids.


#15

that’s what I have actually! (mine is worse than the OP lol)