Assembling your wildfire-ready kit

Seen this article and I wonder if they didn’t miss something, but what it is :thinking::

Get your emergency supply kit ready well before any wildfire or disaster. Make sure it’s accessible for quick evacuation and prepare for the possibility of being away from home for a while.

Your ‘Go Bag’ should be easy to carry and access. Use backpacks to store items like essentials and personal documents. For food and water, consider a wheeled tub or chest for easier transport. Keep your bag light enough for comfortable lifting into your vehicle.

Your ‘Go Bag’ checklist

Ensure your wildfire ‘Go Bag’ includes:

A 3-day supply of non-perishable food & 3 gallons of water per person
A map with at least 2 evacuation routes
Necessary prescriptions or medications
A change of clothes & extra eyeglasses/contact lenses
Extra car keys, credit cards, cash, or traveler’s checks
A first aid kit & sanitation supplies
A flashlight & battery-powered radio with extra batteries
Copies of important documents (birth certificates, passports, etc.)
Pet food & water

Always have sturdy shoes and a flashlight near your bed, ready for sudden night evacuations.

Additional items if time allows

If time allows, consider adding:

  • Valuables that are easy to carry
  • Family photos and irreplaceable items
  • Personal computer data on hard drives and disks
  • Chargers for cell phones and laptops

For more information on emergency supplies, visit www.ready.gov

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Hmmm, Hear Here!!! :mute:

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Cell phone … AND charger.
Thanks for posting that list! It’s about the same for the hurricane preparedness list I’m looking at.

I’m glad I won’t be taking any rechargeable hearing aids + base + power cord TIMES two to get through a whole day. Those days are gone. I’m back to simple battery aids with packs of tiny batteries to-go.

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They mentioned those above, but didn’t mention hearing aids and their power supply (disposable batteries or charger).
I guess you could charge them at the emergency FEMA shelter or local community emergency shelter, not sure about disposable batteries!

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Such lists are always going to have to be individualized depending on one’s needs. Something like “Anything you use on a regular basis. Be sure to include any medications or medical devices.” Many of use CPAP. I’ve gone camping with CPAP. Comparatively dealing with hearing aids is a breeze.

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I can understand your predicament @MDB My wife Elspeth has one of these CPAP machines for sleep apnea, she also has COPD, its a full facial version… It’s fine, except when she moves in her sleep, it then wakes me, by whistling cold air, down the back of my neck :rofl: a few choice expletives (under my breath) and we eventually drift off back to sleep…The Joys of married life :joy:

My whole life consists in a 40L Osprey Bag.

Made my life so much simpler.

I can get up and go in no time at all!

image

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Gotta love Osprey. I have 3 sizes. One for under the plane, one carry-on and 1 backpack for under the seat.

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Osprey 60L Sojourn is my “live-in” bag; Ospray Nova (no longer made) is for carry-on & laptop. They’re THE BEST! :ok_hand:

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