What is the connection?


#1

I know less than zero about Bluetooth.
I know almost as much about streaming.
I am an Android user.

Whether iPhone or Android, do you answer the phone normally, keep it away from your ear and the phone call transfers to your aid?

Does that then mean you need your phone on speaker to converse with the other party?

I’m missing something aren’t I?


#2

I answer the phone normally and the magnet that is attached to my phone transmits the call to both my hearing aids.

I wear Phonak hearing aids and don’t own a streamer as I use DuoPhone.


#3

Ok, thanks Zebras.
Now I know a little more about that magnet I have seen pictures of.
Is that where the “coil” comes into play?


#4

I’ll have a go. Your questions are kinda loaded.

Here’s how I understand it.

If you’re conducting a poll then for me:
Phone rings. I can hear the ring. Of course its volume can be adjusted. I use the phone regularly (speaker to ear, mic near mouth). I am fortunate to be still able to hear the phone naturally. Of course the volume can be adjusted. Probably if I handed the phone to an able-hearing person it would blast them out but whatever.

As for options:
One HA can be streamed to by any modern bluetooth phone. In mono. I think it plays the phone to the other side as well. The phone can be answered by the HA or you can answer the phone. The HA can be controlled by the phone as well.

Many HA’s can be streamed to by an iPhone using an Apple specific variation of bluetooth. Except for the HA mentioned above you would have to hold the phone mic near your mouth. You would have to answer the phone on the phone. It can ring in your HA’s. The HA can be controlled by the iPhone.

Most HA’s offer a necklace (neckloop) device that can control the HA’s and be streamed to again via bluetooth from any modern phone. Or cable. I think it goes to the HA’s via FM. Not sure of that detail.

The “coil” you mention is a whole 'nother animal.
Many HA’s have this thing called a telecoil or t-coil or as you say just coil. It uses an electromagnetic term called induction. You activate it on your HA’s and then walk inside what is called a hearing loop and if something is being amplified across the hearing loop then you will hear it in your HA’s. The “sound” is not audible without a telecoil.
You can also use a personal hearing loop also called a neckloop. Same idea. You output from some kind of amplifier to the neckloop that then your HA’s can “hear”. The personal neckloop may be connected to via bluetooth or cable. It can also operate your HA’s and phone.
All hearing loops are inherently mono. You can hear it in both HA’s but the signal is mono. After market neckloops do NOT use FM. They use induction.

I’ll let someone else fill in the details about the magnet for use with a phone as that is not something I’ve gone looking for. But as I currently understand it…yes. If your HA’s have a telecoil and if they’re programmed to respond automatically to a magnet in their immediate vicinity (ie. a phone with a magnet near its speaker and held near the HA not your canal) then the telecoil turns on. What happens then I’m not sure. Does it play the sound to both HA’s? I guess so but I’m not sure.

Wanna just control the HA’s from a phone? Many HA’s offer programs for the two main mobile OS’s that can control the HA’s. ie volume, programs etc. The one that I know of does it by a high pitched sound signal.

Even more simply, many HA’s offer a remote “clicker” to do the same thing.

That’s how I understand things currently.


#5

Lol, Mr Z.
The questions are no more loaded, than I am.
I genuinely don’t know this stuff.
Hard to believe, I know, but there are still a few of us around.


#6

Alrighty then. Maybe my ramblings can help some. :slight_smile:


#7

Ok, now I’ve read your piece. See, my exposure is truckers who have a gadget looks like a Bic lighter stuck on their ear. Phone sits somewhere and when it rings they smack the Bic, then hear and talk through it. Don’t they?

Since you can’t talk through your hearing aid, I just wondered how that all works.

If I had one of those teslacoils would it interfere with the compass on my boat?


#8

Those gadgets connect via bluetooth to the phone. They’re a lot like PSAP’s. Basically wireless headphones. I’m not sure where exactly the mic is. I would assume it’s at the end of the bic lighter closer to the mouth.

You CAN talk through one of the available hearing aids out there.

teslacoil…um…tele-coil. It’s actually quite old technology in hearing aids. Still works fine though. I would think it wouldn’t be nearly strong enough to affect your compass.


#9

A streamer around your neck works pretty much the same. You Bluetooth pair it to a compatible land phone or cell phone. (one phone at a time?). Once paired, on outgoing calls for the landline, you press the headset button on the phone and everything connects, on the cellphone the connection happens when you press the dial button. On incoming calls for both you press a button on the streamer (like smacking the bic) and you are connected. The streamer has a microphone in it to carry your voice. sort of like the little microphones you see speakers at a convention or someone on a talk show wearing.

I’ll have to tinker with the telecoils to understand how they work. My HA’s have them and they did give me a little bag of magnets. but I’ve never tried them.

Now I have a question, once I’m on a paired cell phone call through my streamer/aids, what do I have to do to pass the phone over to someone else so they can carry on the conversation without my automatically listening in?


#10

Ok, getting clearer now, thanks HalfEar. So how big is this thing around your neck, compared to coins?


#11

Which currency? :slight_smile: The Oticon ConnectClip, including the clip, is about the size as a box of matches.


#12

Lol…wooden matches, by the box, come in various sizes here; waterproof matches being the smaller. They’re for smoking in the shower.


#13

That would be a function of your phone. It’s pretty simple, with an iPhone, to send the call audio to the phone or speaker.


#14

I have not found anything in the Android settings yet. I was hoping it would be something as simple as turning the streamer or Bluetooth on the phone off.


#15

I would have thought that either would do it. On my LG V20 you’ve got a ‘speaker’ button and a ‘bluetooth’ button on the in-call screen. Pressing either button toggles that output. If they’re both off you get a private call through your phone’s speaker. As TexasBob pointed out, each phone is different.


#16

@whahuh. Sorry, I meant Australian matchboxes. They’re big enough to carry about 10 Australian 10 cent coins. Hope that clarifies. :grinning:


#17

So this is an after market bluetooth streamer induction neckloop. I’m not sure where the blue shine is from. Oh well. I can’t imagine the factory one from Rexton (in my case) is much different size.


#18

It’s extremely simple with a streamer and you want to pass the iPhone to someone else to speak. There’s no need to go searching through the phone settings, the actual streamer has an on/off button. Simply turn that off, it disconnects the streaming from the iPhone to the HA’s. The phone then reverts to normal functionality. Don’t forget to turn it on again after that conversation is finished.


#19

Hah! Thanks Z10. More like a puck (d_Wooluf may not know what that is) than a quarter.


#20

I think that IS a term used to describe these things. I’ve also heard the term medallion. But it certainly isn’t as big as a hockey puck.