Update on activation

Hi all! I’m glad for all the support, been trying to get used to how everything sounds. I had an appointment today and my word recognition is 40%, I was told it is normal to have to “relearn” to hear, so I will give it some time. I’m getting better at recognizing sounds so that is good.
What coping methods did everyone use to continue to be positive?
Cheers

Hi Ethan and welcome. What device/processor do you have? I’m bimodal with N7 and Resound Enzo 3D. Everyone’s journey is very individual and very different. I could understanding some speech on activation but environmental sounds took around 6 months to fall into place for me. Yes that’s back to front to most people. Some people take a several mapping before speech starts to fall into place clearly…

I personally set aside 2 hours every day to stream, stream and stream some more. The important thing is rehab do as much as you can fit into your day. But don’t leave yourself overtired that you can’t think. That’s why I limited mine to 2 hours only. If the noise from your processor gets too much just turn it off for an hour. Take as many breaks from the added noise as you need during the day. I streamed anything I could get my ears around, even Ted talks, ugh! I struggled with the accent (I’m an Aussie)

Think long term 12 months down the track when your WRS will be up in the 80+ region or higher.

Whatever you do don’t miss a mapping appointment as with each mapping the sound become clearer for you.

Good luck on your journey.

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Hey! I have an AB Naida CI M. That’s all I know, sorry. I only did one side because my left ear still has aid able residual hearing.
I’m getting very overwhelmed and find myself feeling let down a lot. I’m getting better but I know it’s going to take some time.

Ethan hang in there, it is very overwhelming at the start. You will get used to it slowly but it does take time. When it gets to the stage it’s to much just turn it off for an hour. Don’t worry about having to turn it off either, just do it. Then relax for some time, do something that you don’t have to think about what you are doing. The constant concentration when your processor is on, is extremely tiring at the beginning.

I hope you haven’t returned to work as yet either? Give yourself time to get used to your new “ears” the new way of interpreting sounds. It does take time though. Most importantly give yourself credit for your achievements as well.

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This is pretty good for just getting started.

When did you get activated?

For me anything with speech is training or learning. Watching old TV shows that I am familiar with really helped me learn speech. This was using a TV streamer.

This is easy to do. Wanting instant speech understanding just doesn’t happen for most people. Try to relax and let things happen. For me working to learn speech really wasn’t the answer. Just put yourself in situations that speech is happening, in particular streaming for me. The understanding will come, it just takes some time for your brain to figure it out.
Can you turn the volume down on the processor? That might be another way to try and relax some.

My hearing was bad on both sides so I just quit wearing the hearing aid on the side that had not been implanted yet. I did this 3-4 days after activation but I knew the other ear would be implanted pretty soon. Might try taking the hearing aid off now and then to just see what you think.
I have Cochlear brand implants and N7 and K2 processors.

Deaf_piper (Sheryl) has given you some great advice. She has done very well with her implant/hearing aid combination with 90%+ speech understanding. I think I am pretty close to that too. Got my first implant in October last year and the second implant in January this year.

Have you read about other members implants?

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Ethan you didn’t say how long you have been deaf in your implanted ear for? Generally speaking length of time plays a big role because your highs and lows haven’t heard sound for that length of time. So if you haven’t heard sound for 10-20 years you are going to have to lay down new sound pathways in the implanted ear. And that takes time. You have a WRS of 40% that’s huge for just recently activated. So you new sound pathways have already started for you.

Rehab suggestions for you- I joined our local library. They have a free audiobook section. They downloaded the app to my phone, and set it up for me. Some people even borrow the hard copy and read along with the audio of the book. I never had the need to do that. Then I downloaded “ iangelsounds & Hearoes” onto my phone. They were both very, very basic, I don’t think I did much more than 30 minutes on both those combined. Then I also streamed Ted Talks, ABC Listen, any Podcasts I could stream and get my hands on and get my hands on as well.

As well as all this I just listened to the radio an awful lot. This was to train my brain to manage different types of sound other than streaming. An awful lot of people can’t listen to concerts, radio, live shows etc but I’ve trained myself to do this by listening to the radio. If I’m home alone the radios on all the time.

Do you have an app on your phone that you can control your processor with? Did your CI Aud give you several mappings to work with? Or just the one?
My CI Aud always gave me 4 to work through. And each mapping was louder than the previous one. This is because they are trying to restore some of your high frequencies. At the beginning it’s very hard to cope with. I also struggled with the volume they wanted to push me at.

As @Raudrive (Rick) said turn your volume down, detach your magnet if your at home or just turn off the processor. Your brain hasn’t heard all these sounds for x number of years. It’s now being bombarded with all these weird sounds it’s expected to make sense of so you can understand. Your brain gets exhausted from all this strange noise, even though your brain is doing it’s best to relearn quickly. But it’s overwhelming you as a result. I hope what I’ve said all makes sense.

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I am taking all of this on board for my big day, thank you. I’ve already signed up for audio books with my library, and have access to podcasts. Of all the things I most miss, listening casually to a radio playing in the background is right up there. It is a distant memory. I really appreciate all the advice and encouragement so freely shared on the forum. I hope I can reciprocate in the future.

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Hey everyone, sorry I haven’t been able to respond to all of you. I appreciate your caring responses.

Not great news here, sorry to say. About a week ago when I put my processor on, I was having much more trouble than usual with my implant, then I had a “pop” sound and everything was gone. I made an appointment with my audiologist for the next day. He said this is very rare (<10%). He said it was most likely a “soft” failure, and we are still trying to find out the reason. I’m wondering if anyone else has dealt with this?
Cheers

Really sorry to hear about the implant not functioning properly.
These devices have a warranty. Have you been tested by AB?
Has your surgeon made plans to replace it?

How are you doing?
Let us know.
Good luck

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Hello Ethan, I’m so sorry to hear about your implant not working as it should.
How are you coping with it?
Have you caught up with your surgeon as yet?

I have had a few friends here that have had the internal replaced. They are doing very well now after having the faulty electrode replaced.

Let us know what eventuates. Wishing you all the best.

Good luck

Hi Ethan,

Sorry about the issues with your implant. Keep following up with your audi and surgeon. You might have to have the internal CI replaced. While I’m sure that’s not news you want to read, but that’s a possibility and I don’t think the situation is hopeless. What one goes through for the surgery and the cost of such surgery ( doesn’t matter that insurance covered it, thinking about it, it’s too much of an investment not to get a resolution).

Let us know what happens and what the cause was.

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