Take the shine out of the tube? DIY?

I think it would be a lot less obvious that I even wear hearing aids if I could get the shine out of my hearing aid tubes. I know there is a product out there that colors the tubes but I don’t want to spend the $49. Has anyone had any luck doing something to the tubes to make them reflect less? I’d like to do something to give the tubes a matte finish instead of all the sparkle in a normal tube. Any ideas are appreciated.

Shine is the reflective property. You can minimize it by roughing the surface. Fine sandpaper or something like a Scotchbrite pad can do that. It may shorten the period that the tube stays flexible.

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This one really needs it, it has way too much shine!【ツ】

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You can get tubing that is a matte surface, so no shine.

Thank you audiometrix_hearing! Where can I buy these tubes?

https://www.oaktreeproducts.com/disappear-trs-dri-tube-13t-tubing-a-b-fleshtone-10-bag-30275

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I know someone who shot their tubes with dull coat to eliminate the shine, I told him it would be easier to just buy tubes that had the matte finish. Myself personally shinny or dull doesn’t bother me because nobody ever seems to notice them, even with my HA’s that have standard tubes.

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I’m reminded to also add a suggestion: HA manufacturers need to make the flesh-toned cases match skin tone AND lose their shine! I guess it’s either that or make all aids available in super bright, zany colors like a fashion statement - that could be popular with kids/teens.

It just bugs me how most ITE aids are that AWFUL, shiny, SILLY PUTTY-colored beige. UGH. By contrast, when you get a crown at the dentist’s office, they take a color chart and actually MATCH your adjacent teeth so the crown doesn’t stand out too much.

Is it too much to ask of HA makers to get a little bit more “cosmetic” and aware of WHO wears their product, how OLD they may be, and WHAT would look best?

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Great comment, I totally agree.
~Ed

I put some of my wifes nail polish that was close to my skin color and touched them a little before they dried to dull the finish.

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If you found a workable color, you can add talc to it. It will reduce glare by preventing a smooth surface. Talcum powder would work.

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Thanks to all for the responses. It seems it doesn’t hurt the tubes to spray them so I tried Krylon Matte Spray and it worked! Looking in a mirror I have to hunt to see those tubes now.

I remember my grade school and early high school years where my mental outlook was dictated by how well I thought I had disguised my hearing aid that day with my hair, which I wore long to cover my ears. Bad hair day = bad hearing aid coverage = bad day. I fooled nobody but myself and it wasn’t until my senior year I quit that thinking. I remain surprised to this day that there are adults who worry about whether or not their HA is visible.

Good for you Jeff Bowser! :slight_smile: