So many brands to choose from...need new pair

with worsening thresholds, i now become beyound the fitting charts or ite’s. i like bte’s less but there is not much that can be done. the left has dropped more than the right in the past year.

Hz/R/L
250/50/75
500/60/85
1000/70/90
2000/75/80
3000/80/75
4000/85/80
8000/100/100

L speech: 35%
R speech: 75%

  1. since there are so many brands and models, how do i choose? i think by just looking at fitting charts, i’m a power ite or bte user.

  2. is wdrc as effective for severe/profound losses? would linear be better?

thanks.

the left ear would probably benefit very little from hearing aids,
i would try a high end instrument…

I would say the following …

buy an instrument from one of the top 3 companies

Siemens - i like siemens Centra
Oticon - I like Tego pro power or safran power for this looses

Phonak - Savia art…

would you be able to provide ball park prices for the tego? i’ve tried the savia (my first pair of digital, wdrc aids) more than a year ago. if i went back to it now, i think i would fair better with them. i’m more used to digitals now.

the tego and savia seem similar (autopilot, data logging, etc.). it also seems similar to the destiny’s.

Oticon products and Phonak products are very diferent.
Firts, Savia is a high end instrument while the tego or tego pro is a mid price instrument… The comparable instrument would be the extra (this is a good value)…

The equivalent to the savia is the Syncro… I would strongly suggest that if you are willing to pay 4 a sincro get either a tego (save the money) or put more money on a Epoq W…

on to the features, Phonak has -someone correctme if im wrong please-
4 programs and depending on the enviroment the aid switches to one
the programs. Those programs are customizable in that your audi can
tweek them (prediction based)… However, Oticon has a different approach, their instrument is based on parallel procesing (ie Artificial intelligence). Means that the instrument will pick the features that yield the highest, signal to noise ratio…

On to which is better, hard to say- i have successfully fitted tons of clients with the tego and sincro (i have seen more satisfied customer with tego’s)
But I have seen a great deal of satisfied phonak customers

that said, go by the recomendation of your audi, the most important
thing is that your aid is fell fitted more than specific brand…

will there be anything after the next aaa convention that may ‘replace’ the tego product line?

i’m looking at the price range of the tego but i’m curious if the newest oticon product will bump down the other products, such as the safran, down into the same price range as the current tego prices. if so, it might be worth the wait.

i’ve tried the savia, extra, eleva, cielo, and inteo. of all those, the inteo was the best…but not for my pocketbook! in the meantime, i’m getting by with interton (adro) aids. i think if i went back to the savia or any of them, i would do better now than when i first tried to switch from analogs to digitals.

does the tego pro or safran have g40, g60, and g80 (or equivilent) settings? increasing the g60 curve above the autofit seemed to do well. finally, i assume that unless stated otherwise in any of the product literature, most digital hearing aids use wdrc processing. i think adro was a good stepping stone between analog and digital aids - hence my perception that i would now do better with wdrc digital aids.

thoughts? thanks.

Hi xbulder

A question, if I may. Why would Laubfrosch’s left ear not benefit from a hearing aid? While the losses in both ears look to be outside an open fit, wouldn’t a power BTE with an ear mold help? Is the problem the speech discrimination level? I’ve read that HAs can help improve speech discrimination. Thanks.

Dag

Yes, in general hearing aids improve discrimination. Mostly, if he was my client i would check what would be binaural speech discrimination- Some clients, when they have such a disparity they tend to discriminate worst with 2 instrument compare to one… So if binarual discr… is better i would discuss this with the client…
With this types of clients… its important to talk about realistic expectations…

sorry for the confusion. the majority of the times, both sides are in the 60’s…with the right ear always better (as high as in the 90’s before). bi discr. is usually between 85 and 95%.

Laubfrosh If you have lots of recruitment (which is probable from your audiogram), you need a fast attack WDRC aid that can compress almost instantly the loud passages. ADRO is fine for low or moderate recruitment but it takes too long for the ADRO to kick in if you have lots of recruitment. Ed

if recuitment is an issue, you could measure MCL.
I believe phonak has a way to use a loudness scalling method…

The old GN has something call scalp adapt…

the old oticon products (gaia) has a tool call MCR measurment
it makes the instrument very confortable… however at the expense of
speech discrimination!

Adro is not a propietary product… it has been design by this company
there is a more detail description here

http://www.dynamichearing.com.au/applications_ha_products.html

I’m a big fan of Starkey. It’s one of the largest hearing aid companies, making aids since 1973, and they are American.

You are right you could chose a power ITE. You can get up to 65dB of gain from a good one. Or you can go BTE, where 70-80dB of gain is easily possible.

With a modern digital device it could be programmed with linear or compressed output and changed on the computer at your hearing specialists office. You can then determine which you prefer without having to change the aid.

I would urge you to look at the following public document from GN stock market quartetly filling… So the statement one of the largest companies
in the world is not really accurate…

http://www.gn.com/var/gn/storage/original/application/2f7580170ea511452c20393329f25a6f.pdf

page16

Starkey market share is well behind siemens, oticon, phonak and resound…

dont take this wrong… the spirit of the forum is to provide the info to the consumers as acurate as posible so they can make inteligent desicions…

Fair comment. I meant in terms of American companies and presence in America. Global market share is pretty irrelevant (unless you are an investor). What matters is what service will you receive here in the States. And let’s not forget a little bit of patriotism too, our economy could use some more domestic purchases and less importing from foreign companies.

And don’t take this the wrong way, but the word you were looking for was ‘intelligent’ :rolleyes: Also for that matter ‘accurate’ ‘possible’ and ‘decisions’ :stuck_out_tongue: Download Firefox, it has a built in spell checker. My spelling sucks too!

Global market share does matter, the revenue from global share goes in to
R and D… As you know, Im not american therefore, my writting is below par…

Okay, but the figures you showed were hardly from an independent source. If you look at the UK version of the Starkey web site, they claim “Starkey Laboratories, the world’s largest manufacturer of hearing instruments…” So I guess it depends who you believe, and how you arrive at the numbers.

I didn’t know you were not American, so my apologies for my quip about your spelling. Although I’m sure you can appreciate the irony in spelling intelligence wrong, in that context. And I’m sure even those who speak English as a second language can use a browser with a spell checker.

Let’s face it, Starkey is in 24 countries, and employs over 4,000 people. I don’t think its global market share is going to negatively impact their R&D budget. Frankly, I’ve not seen much that can go toe to toe with their nFusion technology.

In terms of innovation Starkey invented the world’s first canal aid. They also were first to integrate nano and digital technology in a hearing aid.

But we can argue which is better all day long. I used to work for a company in the UK that carried all the major brands, so I have played with a lot of different hearing aids. I think that in terms of recommendations, this brand should be on any short list for a potential hearing aid user. It is an extremely high quality American product, from a strong American company.

I have been wearing Starky CIC Endeavours (3 program) for 5 years. They have been excellent aids and the service I have received from my local audi (Starky exclusive dispenser) has been excellent.

Now, my hearing has degraded to a point where a CIC is not an option (need 60db at 250hz).

And Starkey seems to be behind the curve in mini-BTE’s to fit this hearing loss. I am still fairly young and do not want an oversized aid hanging off my ear with a big tube over the top.

I also want a remote control for volume and program change.

If Starkey is such a big company, why are they so far behind the curve?

the answer is the amount of resources needed to develop new products…
Starkey is a private company and therefore there are a lot of details that are
kept secret… but if you look at Phonak or Oticon you can see the amount of money invested in RD almost 20% of the gross income…

For those who has been dispensing a long long time, the one who really came up with the concept of an instant fit, open instrument was GN resound
with the Air, the company had a lot of struggles and fail to develop a Receiver in the ear or receiver in the canal instrument (they have just introduce it)…

if you are looking for a mini bte with remote control reciver in the ear or receiver in the canal instruments, with multiple program look at either
Audeo (phonak), siemens, Unitron or Bernafon Brite… …

I don’t really accept they are behind the curve at all. Their Destiny BTE power is pretty small, and can give you 70dB of gain, with some of the best noise reduction and feedback cancellation out there.

What’s more they have in the ear devices that go to 65dB of gain. They don’t publish that information, because they don’t want to do it all the time, but if your specialist gets with the factory, they can crank the power up without feedback issues.

In fact you’d be surprised just how low they can go with CICs these days. I’ve seen studies of people with 80dB losses fitted with Starkey CICs.

Frankly, the idea of the remote control is WAY behind the curve. I was fitting product with remotes back in the late 90s, and as soon as better technology came along I dumped it instantly. With the right hearing aid a remote is an utter waste of time, money, and effort. It is cumbersome and more trouble than it’s worth.

[quote=ZCT]Okay, but the figures you showed were hardly from an independent source. If you look at the UK version of the Starkey web site, they claim “Starkey Laboratories, the world’s largest manufacturer of hearing instruments…” So I guess it depends who you believe, and how you arrive at the numbers.

I didn’t know you were not American, so my apologies for my quip about your spelling. Although I’m sure you can appreciate the irony in spelling intelligence wrong, in that context. And I’m sure even those who speak English as a second language can use a browser with a spell checker.

Let’s face it, Starkey is in 24 countries, and employs over 4,000 people. I don’t think its global market share is going to negatively impact their R&D budget. Frankly, I’ve not seen much that can go toe to toe with their nFusion technology.

If there is one thing most companies do agree is siemens is the largest company in the world, most people would agreee this…

Im surprise, Starkey UK claims to be the biggest in the world…