ReSound LiNX Quattro vs Oticon OPN 1's


#41

Hi, Mark. You’re turning things around a bit. I didn’t claim “advantageous” - but just the opposite, that your claim that rechargeables are disadvantageous is a bit extreme. Unless one is camping out in the woods far away from electricity, there really is no disadvantage to a rechargeable like the Quattro. You make recharging them every night a chore. When you take your HA’s out every night to go to sleep, you have to put them somewhere. Put them in the case, the HA’s are recharged while they’re being stored-and you’re guaranteed as much as 30 hours use when you wake up-not so for a disposable that you’re running down and will wear out sometime during the coming day. Since I haven’t trialed any other HA’s, I don’t have any experience with disposable batteries but if anything is a chore, peeling the paper off the back of the battery, getting the old battery out, the new one in, covering up the batteries every night as some do, opening and closing battery doors, saving used batteries for proper disposal, now we’re talking menial chores as compared to just popping a Quattro in its slot to rest (and recharge in overnight) whether the case is plugged in or not. I spend about a half hour getting up in the morning, a half hour going to bed at night and I have many other things like a Braun electric razor that periodically needs to be cleaned and recharged, same for maintaining the charge on a phone or two, a Surface device, Bluetooth wireless headphones, etc. So recharging my Quattro’s is just a very modest, natural task to add to my daily routine (since I’m not camping out in the woods far away from electricity like you are, apparently!) in my everyday scheme of things.


#42

Jim you’re being redundant albeit considerably more verbose. 30 hours yes I already knew that. Great for you but not for me. That I find them unacceptable has nothing to do with you and what you prefer. You like them and that’s fine. No detailed exposition of how easy they are for you with references to headphones and razors is necessary. I’m rather non plussed by rechargeable things that aren’t more or less stationary. Unless it’s a Tesla. I might consider one of those.


#43

Be nice be nice. I really appreciate both of you for helping me. Thank you guys


#44

Rechargeables don’t seem like a good choice for a medical resident, based on what I’ve read about their life: Long hours, lying down to sleep wherever and whenever they can, exhausted when they do get home.


#45

I would agree. Rechargeables are not for everyone. Especially in a non-private medical environment, e.g., my wife returning to the on-call room of a New York hospital some 40 years or so ago and seeing a street person walking down the hall with a bag of her “stuff” (guess hospital security was in need of an upgrade back then!).

The point of my replying to Mark Chambers is that he’s the one that initiated the debate with a very dismissive remark “Rechargeables are for stay at home folks with limited chance of draining their charge.” I think most people can fit rechargeable into their life style and they are not really more or less of a hindrance than carrying around and changing out disposable batteries and all the other little things associated with disposable battery use. Hearing aids are supposed to be removed when sleeping (at least behind the ear, RIC(RITE) ones. One would need a case to put them in. And even residents are allowed to sleep. Most sleep at least a few hours a night. But according to the Wikipedia article, residents can still be required to fulfill a straight 30-hours shift. So Quattro’s would certainly not work for someone who has to go 30 hours straight absolutely without sleep but would if you could count on getting 1 or 2 hours sleep a night (1 hour of charging can give you at least 8 more hours of battery life).

Mark keeps raising straw men. Now I’m trying to convince him to use rechargeables (according to Mark). Just trying to make clear that his original remark that rechargables are only for “stay-at-home folks” is pretty vapid. And according to ReSound, the rechargeable option is being offered because folks are clamoring for it. So one can try to figure that one out. According to the reasoning offered, that must mean that most HA users are “stay-at-home folks” because rechargeables will only work for such people…… So then there should be no problem for most people, ergo ipso facto…


#46

A little history of rechargeables while I’ve been on the forum (only a couple of years) might help explain why most of us consider rechargeables a solution in search of a problem.
Phonak apparently did a survey to find out what the most compelling problem was for hearing aid users and the result they came up with was rechargeable hearing aids. It was met with a “You’ve got to be kidding me” reaction as anybody on the forum could have told you that a hearing aid that could stream from an android phone was the answer. So, you’ve got a bunch of us who are quite satisfied with our dirt cheap disposable batteries resenting having tech pushed on us that was more expensive, expensive to replace if not under warranty and didn’t offer an easy portable fix if the battery died unexpectedly. Rechargeables were a boon for people with poor dexterity and/or vision. Glad your Quattro rechargeables work well for you. I imagine there will come a time when it will be difficult to find a non rechargeable hearing aid, but I think it will take awhile for a lot of us old farts to die off. By the way your battery pack type device was not a standard thing with the original rechargeables.


#47

I agree 100% that it’s pretty stupid to offer only a rechargeable solution and no battery pack. ReSound does offer a Quattro equivalent that takes disposables.
And as you say, I’ll be SOL if either a battery or the battery pack charger dies. But the same thing holds for a regular HA user. If they lose, destroy, or just have an HA die. they could be in the same predicament. So I look forward to eventually keeping my old Quattro’s as backups as most users do with previous models. I’m not advocating FOR rechargeable over disposables. I’m just saying that rechargeables don’t deserve dumb dismissals.


#48

This forum is a young lot, though. There is quite a large population of users who cannot manage batteries, and yet still want to maintain as much independence as possible.


#49

Agreed. Hence this line:


#50

The point of my replying to Mark Chambers is that he’s the one that initiated the debate with a very dismissive remark “ Rechargeables are for stay at home folks with limited chance of draining their charge .”

Awe, you’ve taken this personally and feel dismissed. That’s the point of your replying. Good grief.

I think most people can fit rechargeable into their life style and they are not really more or less of a hindrance than carrying around and changing out disposable batteries and all the other little things associated with disposable battery use.

That’s good that you can speak for most people and having never worn aids before are thoroughly familiar with all the nuances of standard 312 battery usage. Look anyone can most likely fit a rechargeable device in but it would require that I make certain concessions that I’m not willing to make. You see my poor offended friend my rejection of rechargeables has nothing to do with you. Now this may come as a surprise to you and it’s not meant to hurt your feelings but I honestly don’t care what you do. What you like and what you don’t for whatever reasons you choose has nothing to do with me.

Hearing aids are supposed to be removed when sleeping (at least behind the ear, RIC(RITE) ones.

ROTFLOL.

One would need a case to put them in.

I set mine on the dresser at night. Once in awhile I’ll put them in a UV dryer. Never had a problem.

And even residents are allowed to sleep. Most sleep at least a few hours a night. But according to the Wikipedia article, residents can still be required to fulfill a straight 30-hours shift. So Quattro’s would certainly not work for someone who has to go 30 hours straight absolutely without sleep but would if you could count on getting 1 or 2 hours sleep a night (1 hour of charging can give you at least 8 more hours of battery life).

Wikipedia? Is that like the Journal of the American Medical Association? Sheesh! By the way your little stories are precious.

Mark keeps raising straw men.

Oh you’re a logician too? What I have said is that rechargeable aids, at least those of the Quattro and Phonak type, 30 hours or not, tie you to a charger. You always have to return to the well and there is always the possibility of using them up—at least there is for me. You see I’m not the stay at home type. No straw man. You might want to run through a quick refresher with your Copi’s.

Now I’m trying to convince him to use rechargeables (according to Mark).

You’re not paying attention. Never said that either explicitly or by implication. I have said that I’m happy you like your rechargeable aids but they have limitations that I don’t like.

Just trying to make clear that his original remark that rechargables are only for “stay-at-home folks” is pretty vapid.

Oh there you go again being personally offended. I’ll try and remember to take care of your feelings from now on. You do realize that this is all about your wounded feelings? You’ve got your panties in a knot over what is nothing more than a generalization.

And according to ReSound, the rechargeable option is being offered because folks are clamoring for it. So one can try to figure that one out.

Of course. And it’s not hard to figure out. Dexterity can be a problem for the geriatric set not to mention that there ARE a lot of stay at home types in that category. OH DARN there I go again. Mea Culpa. Mea Maxima Culpa!

According to the reasoning offered, that must mean that most HA users are “stay-at-home folks” because rechargeables will only work for such people…… So then there should be no problem for most people, ergo ipso factor.

That would be ipso facto. And by the way that first sentence is a non sequitur. Check your Copi’s. Wasn’t this fun?


#51

Thanks for pointing out the typo. It was probably generated by this site’s autocomplete/autocorrect, which I find a constant annoyance. It would be great if there’s a way to turn that “feature” off.

Although going back to the post you’re quoting I don’t see the typo - so maybe it was somehow generated in the process of quoting? At any rate, a way to turn off autocomplete/autocorrect on this site would be marvelous.


#52

My opinion comes from my experience.


#53

To get this thread back on point. . .

One thing I learned earlier this week in the Marvel training I attended is that while Roger compatibility for Phonak Marvels will, indeed, be turned on via a firmware update in Fall 2019, it will not likely be free. There will likely be a fee for the update to “unlock” this feature for those interested in and needing it. Phonak has not yet determined exactly what the fee will be or if might be bundled for free with the purchase of Roger devices, etc, but they seemed pretty certain that it wouldn’t just be turned on without charge for everyone.

This was new to me. Glad that I know it so as not to set any incorrect expectations for those purchasing now.


#54

Major bummer that Phonak Marvels will nickel and dime you like that.

I am strongly considering getting the Roger System after researching it for quite some time. 3 Roger pen’s + the receiver for the multi mic that I already have. This would be in addition to new hearing aids. I don’t know how much a new Roger pen (1.1) costs, but I will bring it up to my audiologist. The fact that these can switch mics to whoever is talking automatically is amazing.

Anybody have experience with multiple pens running simultaneously on ReSound hardware?

Does Oticon OPN work with Roger? Evoke 440?


#55

Just kidding here, but the ORIGINAL topic of the thread is Quattro’s vs. OPN 1’s - so how is bringing up Phonak Marvel’s getting the thread back on point?! :grin:


#56

:joy:
You’re right (and I always appreciate a bit of humor).

Chris


#57

Glad someone mentioned Widex. Have been using Beyond 440s for a year. As hearing aid user of 27+ years and a musician I haven’t found a better sounding hearing aid including OPN, Starkey, and Phonak.


#58

As an aging obstetrician with otosclerosis plus, the Oticon Opns have been great for me at work. I’m able to hear speech (including in the OR) so much more easily that the rest of my brain is freed up to actually think about what I’m doing. I bought a remote mic but never end up needing it.


#59

How severe is your hearing loss, @mkiellz? Thanks for your input!


#60

Medium? “ Right ear: mild to severe sensorineural hearing loss at 250 Hz and at 2000-8000Hz. Left ear: mild to severe mixed hearing loss at 250 Hz and at 1500-8000 Hz.