Phonak compilot or Siemens minitek

My wife is in need of new hearing aids. She has profound loss in right ear and serious loss in the other. She tried a pair of Rexton aids and the mini blu and we are in the process of trying phonaks Brio P from Costco with the com pilot. My question is whether the com pilot will work as well as the miniblu for tv bluetooth etc. Comments would be appreciated.

Freq. L. R.

  1. 75 95
  2. 75 95
  3. 65 85
    1500 70 85
    2000 70 85
    3000 65 90
    4000 65 90
    6000 70 85
    8000 70 85

Disclaimer: Hearing aid usage is very subjective. It depends very much on your particular hearing and the individual that programs your aids and his or her skill.

I had a pair of Rexton aids with the Tek remote that could both control the aids and feed audio to the aids from a source such as a TV or computer. It worked fairly well. The portable part of the unit was worn around your neck on a ribbon. The audio quality was ok, but would have drop outs as the unit moved.

I had to replace the Rextons about this time last year. The Rextons were about three years old. I was having trouble having them re-programmed purportedly due to their age and availability of software. I went to three different audiologists before I broke down and purchased the new aids.

I choose a pair of Phonak Naida Q70s. In my humble and personal opinion, the Phonaks are far superior. Both sets were similar in price at around $5000 for the pair plus accessories. In every respect I can hear better with the Phonaks. It may be due to the new generation of hearing aid. New Rextons may be just as good. I don’t know. The Naidas have very good audio quality in difficult situations. I even listen to music during the day through my aids using the Com Pilot. The fidelity is most pleasing. I hadn’t listened to music in years until I obtained the Naidas. I have found the Com Pilot to be much more reliable. I believe it is due to the insulated wire that you use to hang it around your neck. I believe it acts as an antenna. I really don’t know, but it works well.

For me, the Phonak Naida Q70s are incredible. They are far and above the best aids I have experienced since my first set of analog aids 10+ years ago.

YMMV, Jeff

— Updated —

Disclaimer: Hearing aid usage is very subjective. It depends very much on your particular hearing and the individual that programs your aids and his or her skill.

I had a pair of Rexton aids with the Tek remote that could both control the aids and feed audio to the aids from a source such as a TV or computer. It worked fairly well. The portable part of the unit was worn around your neck on a ribbon. The audio quality was ok, but would have drop outs as the unit moved.

I had to replace the Rextons about this time last year. The Rextons were about three years old. I was having trouble having them re-programmed purportedly due to their age and availability of software. I went to three different audiologists before I broke down and purchased the new aids.

I choose a pair of Phonak Naida Q70s. In my humble and personal opinion, the Phonaks are far superior. Both sets were similar in price at around $5000 for the pair plus accessories. In every respect I can hear better with the Phonaks. It may be due to the new generation of hearing aid. New Rextons may be just as good. I don’t know. The Naidas have very good audio quality in difficult situations. I even listen to music during the day through my aids using the Com Pilot. The fidelity is most pleasing. I hadn’t listened to music in years until I obtained the Naidas. I have found the Com Pilot to be much more reliable. I believe it is due to the insulated wire that you use to hang it around your neck. I believe it acts as an antenna. I really don’t know, but it works well.

For me, the Phonak Naida Q70s are incredible. They are far and above the best aids I have experienced since my first set of analog aids 10+ years ago.

YMMV, Jeff

Jeff, I am considering the same switch. What is the difference between a Q 70 and the Q 50 that was recommended to me?

— Updated —

Jeff, I am considering the same switch. What is the difference between a Q 70 and the Q 50 that was recommended to me?

Simple Google search comes up with this: (I’ve done your homework for you)

Hi Pavane,

I paid the extra cost for the Q70 rather than the Q50 due to the additional “Stereo Zoom” feature. I had hoped that the Stereo Zoom feature would help with conversation at crowded restaurants and similar environments. I have found in use over the past year that the “auto” setting works very well for every situation. Hence, the Q50 would have been just as good for my use and I could have saved the extra cost.

Jeff

PS, I have no idea why my message was doubled in this thread.

Not necessarily. The Q70 has a more sophisticated automatic program than the Q50, and it also has a multi-band adaptive directional microphone versus single-band on the Q50. So you may be getting your money’s worth.

I too am a very satisfied user of the Phonak Naida Q70s(in my case BTE for added power) They are the best hearing aids I have owned in over 50+ years of using hearing aids. The CommPilot is a very beneficial part of my hearing system as it gives very good phone connection and quality. The ability to change programs and adjust volume and quickly reset to the “normal” program are all great features.