Nano-diamond self-charging batteries could disrupt energy as we know it

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That would be great if they can fulfill that promise.

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Yes, I feel like new battery innovations are a dime a dozen in the news… But this one does seem pretty promising.

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Count me skeptical. I had to double check it wasn’t in the Onion. Hope my skepticism is completely unwarranted.

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Wikipedia has an article about the technology. Seems somewhat contradictory to the article as Wiki article says it’s very low power density and only for very low power devices. I guess one can’t really talk about the chemistry of the battery?, but the process generates about 2 volts. (a little more than zinc air’s 1.7 volts, but less than lithium ion’s ~3.7 volts.)

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Current as well as voltage is key.

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Interesting if it could live up to the what is said. It be nice to not have to worry about recharging a battery or changing one in a hearing aid. We will have to wait and see.

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I will just hope this is true, but I have a saying if it sounds too good to be true then more than likely it is not true.

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Let’s see recycled nuclear waste behind my ears, in my pocket, and resting in my lap. And based on history we know nuclear waste is always safe and has never leaked right?

Yep sign me up I have had all the kids I want.

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I like the time span on longevity - 10 years to 28,000 years. Seems like they have a little work to get that variable under control!

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I am skeptical as well. This wouldn’t be the first time someone announced a revolutionary new product with outlandish claims, only to disappear after enough people invested.

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Wanna guess what it would add to the average price of a hearing aid?

They stated that radiation is less than that of a human body. So if that ends to be true, it won’t harm you more than having a kid in your lap :slight_smile:

It’s definitely very interesting tech, but I’m not sure when they could make it small enough for HAs. Since for the safety they need to wrap a core. That takes space. But who knows what can become out of it in next 10 years :slight_smile:

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Sounds VERY good. If it sounds too good to be true…

Wow! Solve nuclear fuel waste and battery storage at the same time! ?

Extracting and isolating the Carbon-14 isotope is not as simple as they make it sound.

Probably won’t be in my lifetime.

After they’ve got the C-14 out of graphite control rods, they still have to do something with the byproduct waste. So it just passes the problem around a bit. And their own blurb on the product implies that the would-be battery is not 100% pure - there’s still some other junk in it. (see bottom of page at The Technology | NDB

Lock-in System: Using a nuclear power source for a battery system brings up the question of nuclear proliferation due to production of fissionable isotopes such as Pu- 238 and U-232. To tackle this issue, NDB uses an ion implantation mechanism called “lock-in system” which prevents usage other than power generation. This increases the usability, by meeting consumer safety requirements

Funny comments here:

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The sad truth is that battery technology is evolutionary, and anything that claims to be more is pretty much guaranteed to be grossly over-hyped, or at least many years from commercial exploitation. Batteryuniversity.com is my go-to reference for putting most of these claims into perspective.

And another thing. Why on earth would this thing need a 64 pin package (if I can count correctly) as shown in the article? Most batteries I’ve ever come across just have 2 terminals, labelled + and -. Or maybe these nooklear electricicles are different.

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Interesting that the 22 pin DIP socket device shown in the link is probably longer than a BTE hearing aid and apparently supplies 100 microwatts of power according to the label. A typical modern hearing aid probably draws about 2 milliamps (or more) from a nominal 1.45 volt zinc-air battery or about 3 milliwatts of power. So the device pictured would have to be scaled up by about a factor of 30 in power :slight_smile: I’m not sure what that means in volume for this new device …

For the relatively short period I’ve been wearing aids (7 years), the power consumption has increased with radios (Bluetooth) and more computationally intensive processing - I don’t see that trend changing in the near future.

Perhaps it’s due to limitations on drawing electricity (conductivity) through the battery material without a significant voltage drop in the device itself? The battery must be some sort of solid state electrolyte (of which I know very little about!)