Mid-range vs premium (or high end)

Anyone of you tried an HA considered mid-range than tried one considered high-end or premium? What was the main difference (in general)? Would you say it worth the difference in $$$?

If I’m going to spend my money, I want the best I can get but on the other hand do not want to spend the extra grand if I’m not going to see a real difference…

The only hearing aid I’ve had (bought about five years ago) is a BTE Siemens Prisma 2 P. I cannot stand the enormous ear mold and was never ultra impressed with the performance (although it was better than nothing and never compared it to anything else). Haven’t worn it in a couple years actually.

new Mid price instruments are being introduce now, this intruments are expected to perform significantly better than previous high end instruments…
So far Unitron (next) and Oticon Vigo had been launch…

Now, I would expect that when for example Phonak introduces a new mid price solution it will be even better that of Unitron an Oticon. When the extra was introduced, it included significant more features than the tego or tego pro…

So I would not be a bit surprise if phonak introduce a mid price instrument
that is wireless.

I’m not sure what the “wireless” does… All I could find was that when one aid is adjusted, the other is adjusted at the same tiem (e2e). If you only need one hearing aid, is the wireless feature of any use?

And what does it mean when they say you can use it with tv, radio, cell, mp3 player, all electronic devices, etc. How does that differ from a regular hearing aid?

(Sorry, I’m a complete newbie at researching HA!)

To make is simple, there are other features inside the hearing aid, that could be sincronize. For example Noise reduction… a wireless instrument could comunicate with the other instrument and both of them could work hand in hand. So if for example one instrument is set to reduce noise it could comunicate the other to also do the same…

E to E refers to Cordination, which is often refer to Volume control program changes, I believe the higher end instruments from siemens also do sincronization and I suspect even processing…

Most High end instrument (wireless), allow for the streaming of
music, tv, phones , pc via bluetooth…

Currently, Oticon, Siemens and Phonak have such solutions…

I would expect soon others would follow… This would be the standart quite soon…

Wireless does usually mean that the two hearing aids can communicate with each other, so it is not a useful feature if you only have one hearing aid.

As for using the hearing aids with other electronic devices, it means that it can send the signals from these devices directly to the hearing aids vs. having to listen over the air. For example, with Oticon’s Epoq you wear a device called a “streamer” around your neck and can then plug other electronic devices into the streamer, which will transmit the signal to the aids. It is like listening to your iPod through your own headphones vs. listening to a boom box…much better fidelity, and background noise is not as much of a problem. Also, many of the newer devices are compatible with bluetooth which is quite useful.

I think that by and large you get what you pay for.

But it really depends on the patient. If I am presented with a patient who is 85, not very active, and lives alone, an entry to mid range product is easily going to meet all their needs.

But if I have a patient who is 35, still very active, working, going to noisy restaurants and bars, I am going to suggest high end. Because high end not only gives a better sound, but also is generally better at reducing background noise versus a mid range aid.

the new generation mid price instrument performs so well that if your needs are not so demanding you can get a good value…
So far, Oticon and Unitron has come up with new mid price instrument with
good features, therefore- I will expect within 6 months others to follow
and ofcourse, it will be even better…

this is good because it will raise the bar…