Lyric hearing aid by Insound Medical

Does anyone have any experience with the new Lyric hearing aid by Insound Medical? It sounds like it has the potential to be really exciting. It’s buried deep in the ear canal, is completely invisible, and is worn for months at a time. Sounds like what I’ve been looking for my entire life. Here is a link to the product and manufacturer’s web sites:


http://www.insoundmedical.com

I’d love to hear any experiences anyone has had with the product or company.

Thank you!

none
got to be a small company as It is not even a himsa member

Sorry. I haven’t heard of that company or product. I’ll take a look at the website.

I’ve got to find out more about the Lyric ASAP. I am about to spend ALOT of money on another type of hearing aid. I understand the Lyric is only available in CA. How long will it take for it to make its way out to OH ?

Thank you.

I did take a look at the website. There is not a whole lot of info there. My concerns would be:

  1. Comfort?- If it is not a custom fit, and goes that deep I would really question the comfort. Having had deep impression in my canal I know that the bony portion of the canal is very sensitive.

  2. Occlusion- There would be a significant occlusion effect for this hearing aid. Not that some others don’t have the same but there would definitely be issues with occlusion (increased volume of your own voice).

  3. Reliability- With the deep placement for a month at a time, the components would likely be very succesptible to moisture, condensation, wax, etc.

  4. Feedback- with any amount of gain, I would expect feedback problems if you left the aid in while sleeping, lying down on the ear, etc.

Perhaps some of these items have been addressed, but this is my first reaction looking at the device on their website. The only advantage of this device I see is that it is completely invisible. To me, that is probably not worth some of the other drawbacks. Additionally, there is no mention of processing strategy, compression, output limiting, feeback reduction algorithm, noise reduction, etc.

I see that Insound got FDA approval for this type of device around 12/2/2002.

Why has it taken 5+ years - and it isn’t yet widely available ?? Sounds like I should go forward with my appointment this week.

  • It’s supposed to reduce the occlusion effect because it is placed so close to the ear drum.

  • It got FDA approval in 2002 but hasn’t been commercially available until only a few months ago.

I live in California, so I’m going to make an appointment in the next few weeks to check it out. I’ll let everyone know what I find out!

Alex-

The theory of reducing the occlusion effect is that if you can place the hearing aid in the bony portion of the canal (the most medial, closest to the eardrum) that the occlusion effect will be reduced or eliminated. The occlusion effect arrises from the cartilaginous portion of the canal set into vibration by one’s own voice.

Early reports on CICs were that they would reduce occlusion for the same reason, but those did not come to fruition. If the entire device is placed within the bony portion, the occlusion effect could certainly be reduced.

I’ll be interested to hear how you do with a trial. Please keep us informed.

I have CICs now, and yes, there is still definitely an occlusion effect. I only wear them for work and the fact that my voice sounds hollow to me is causing me to feel self conscious when I talk. I feel like my voice is operating out of another person’s body. I start thinking too much about how my words sound, and then I get tripped up, forget what I’m talking about, etc.

Even more importantly to me is the invisibility feature. I’d be much more comfortable if I wasn’t always thinking about who’s looking at my ears. I’m sure many people feel the same way.

Lastly, the fact that they’re designed to be worn all the time is very exciting. I want a hearing aid that fits seamlessly into my life. One that can be worn while sweating, showering, or sleeping and doesn’t require daily cleaning. And Insound promises this.

Anyway, I hope I’m not getting myself too excited too soon. And I have no idea what the cost (per year) will be (since they’re disposable every few months, they’re sold on a yearly subscription basis) but they definitely have the potential to be terrific.

[quote=docg]Alex-

The theory of reducing the occlusion effect is that if you can place the hearing aid in the bony portion of the canal (the most medial, closest to the eardrum) that the occlusion effect will be reduced or eliminated. The occlusion effect arrises from the cartilaginous portion of the canal set into vibration by one’s own voice.

Early reports on CICs were that they would reduce occlusion for the same reason, but those did not come to fruition. If the entire device is placed within the bony portion, the occlusion effect could certainly be reduced.

I’ll be interested to hear how you do with a trial. Please keep us informed.[/QUOTE

to do this you need a really really long impresion…

Hello - I’m new here, but found this site when I was researching Lyric. I do live in California, and saw a large quarter page ad in the SF Chronicle for the Lyric hearing device, so am trying to check it out. It all sounds great, but I’m wondering if it doesn’t cost a fortune. I’ve located a Lyric doctor just a block from my office and am going to visit them this week to get more information.

I have qualms about things being poked deep into my ear over and over again, but would enjoy the invisibility factor.

I will report back after my visit. But if anyone else has any info, please post it. Thanks. Nancee

Shop around, I would also ask for technical specifications, such as
features such as noise reduction, number of channels, feedback canceler etc.

I would then compare it against, Perhaps Oticon Tego, Phonak Extra and GN Pixel - all mid price instruments from big companies with very resonable costs…

Ofcourse there are other great instruments, perhaps COSTCO could be a place to visit…

I would hesitate to leave anything deep in my ear canal for months at a time.

All kinds of bugs out there that would love that scenario. Fungi too. Ed

First post for me BTW…I just wanted to give a shout since there is so little actual information about the device and the subscription service.

  1. I was quoted a subscription price of $4000/year.

  2. I was told I was not a good candidate for a Lyric Hearing device/subscription because my hearing loss was too severe. It is a small device, and the size limits the amount of amplification power it can provide. Lyric Hearing is for people with mild hearing loss…A small negative slope on your hearing evaluation graph. My hearing exam graph looks more like the right side of an upside down parabola.

  3. I saw a display version of this device lodged in a cutaway ear model. It LOOKS disposable. The baffles that hold the device in place look so fragile, I seriously doubt it can be reconditioned, re-used, or re-implanted.

  4. The external microphone surface of the device has two very tiny filament loops over it’s grid, which I assume is for the extraction tool. The subscriber is given an extraction tool and can remove the Lyric Hearing device at any time.

However the subscriber is supposed to return to their audiologist for either re-insertion of the original device, or a fresh replacement. I don’t know what happens in that scenario. You should ask.

(It may count on their 10 replacements per year plan on the $4k subscription.)

In any case, that’s all of the information I have on the Lyric Hearing device and it’s subscription service…An actual user may provide more info in the future.

PS. Since I need a BHE “Behind The Ear” solution, I’m going to test-drive a set of Phonak Exélia M’s next week.

http://www.exelia.phonak.com/en/

Cheers everybody!

Biggeek

I had my appointment this morning and am currently trying the devices free for 30 days. I was quoted $2900/ year which includes unlimited office visits and replacement devices. (This was a promo rate at my office. They said after this month it’ll go up to $3200/ year). You have to go in at least every 120 days for replacements.

So far, I am very pleased with the Lyric aids. They are completely invisible to anyone looking at your ear. The sound of my own voice is far superior to the CICs that I currently own. I can place my hands over my ears and get no feedback at all. They promise that sweating and getting wet are no problem, as the aids form a tight seal around the ear canal, allowing no moisture behind the device. If you swim, you’re not supposed to really submerge your head too much. For me, that’s not really a problem. I don’t swim all that much, and if I do, it doesn’t bother me to not put my head under the water for extended periods of time.

It comes with a magnet that you can use to adjust the volume or put the devices in sleep mode. Sleep mode allows you to experience your regular, bad hearing for sleeping. You can also turn them completely off if you want. It’s very easy to operate.

It hasn’t been 24 hours yet, but I’m very happy and excited so far. If anyone has questions, feel free to ask me. I’ll let you all know how the month progresses.

Hi Alex,
Can you tell me your hearing loss? I am certainly like to try this invisible hearing aids. Is this only available in US? I am living in Canada and wonder whether Lyrics will be sold in Canada?

Thanks
Paul

Hi Paul,

My loss is in the mild / moderate range. Probably more towards moderate now. Go to www.lyrichearing.com and click on Find a Lyric Professional up at the top. That will tell you where your closest vendor is. I have a feeling it might only be availible in California right now, as I checked in other parts of the US and it’s not available yet. Let us know what you find.

Alex

How about a follow up? Are you getting occlusion effects?

Unfortunately, after my initial excitement, the Lyric ended up not being a great solution for me at this time. The material they’re made out of iritated my skin a bit and my ears produced a lot of wax and dead skin. I have fairly sensitive skin and I was afraid this may happen. The doctor said they’re working with dermatologists and are continually revising the material they’re made out of to make them as hypo-allergenic as possible.

However, I still think it’s a great product. To answer BigGeek’s question, compared to the CICs I currently wear for work, there is little to no occlusion effect. It’s great. If they can figure out a way to make them work better with my sensitive skin (or how to make my skin less sensitive) it would be perfect. I’m definitely willing to try them again when they come out with their next generation. The office where I got them offers a 30 day free trial so if you don’t like them or if they don’t work for you, like they didn’t for me this time, you pay nothing.

Alex, i know a bit about the Lyric product and I may be able to give you some tips about how to use it properly- I do not believe your issues are related to an allergic reaction since the materials used in the lyric are extremely hypoallegric and should produce no reaction whatsoever when contacting the ear canal skin- unless there is a pressure point and that can cause irritation-regardless of the material used-- this situation may appear like an allergic reaction but it is not-- so, the solution (1) try a different size device that may fit better with less pressure- (2) wait for the much smaller device expexcted to be available next year which should be more comfortable for most., (3) simply try the same device again after your “vergin” ears have become less sensetive now after the initial trauma- this was reported by many people who had problem first time around!!! hope this helps. Ed