Learning Curve

I have enjoyed reading the comments from this group and wish I knew enough about this technology to keep-up! You guys are amazing. I hope that some of you might be able to break down some of these devices so I can start learning … I’m lost! Hearing aids are a whole new area of technology for me and I can’t figure out where to start. Any suggestions, links or information is greatly appreciated … :confused:

My father has high-pitch hearing loss and struggles with hearing in many situations. I have decided to become more proactive in finding solutions that can help. He has high-quality digital hearing aids and we’re thinking of trying bluetooth hearing aids. From reading the messages in this forum, I understand that there are some great possibilities with bluetooth. I get confused with the devices that have been mentioned and hope to get some help!

  1. My father is interested in getting an iPhone (3Gs). I believe I read that some of the members here have been successful with pairing bluetooth hearing aids directly with the new iPhone? Is the volume/clarity working well for telephone conversations? Is there any bluetooth adapters for a land line?

  2. I understand that there are bluetooth accessories for TV that can be paired with bluetooth hearing aids. This seems like it could be a huge improvement over wireless headphones. Has anybody found this helpful? Is one brand considered better than another?

  3. I’ve seen some of the members here mention a “box” that can be placed on a table to help hear conversations, meetings, etc. Has anybody found this helpful? Does it help control background noise? Going out to dinner or being in a room with background noise is so difficult for my Dad. I hope this could be a solution.

  4. It seems like sending the sound into the ear via bluetooth would create better sound quality because there’s no outside noise. Does it work like this? Are there other devices we should test while he has the “free trial”?

Thank you all!!!

The two hearing aids that come to mind with bluetooth and are found repeatedly on the Hearing Aid Forum are the Phonak Audeo Yes IX or the Oticon Dual XW. Since you are now a member you can do a series of searches on these aids in the " Digital Hearing Aids " section of the Forum and find any or all of the information you are looking for ? Your search will also guide you to outside information .

Here is a start :

  1. My father is interested in getting an iPhone (3Gs). I believe I read that some of the members here have been successful with pairing bluetooth hearing aids directly with the new iPhone? Is the volume/clarity working well for telephone conversations?

Yes paired with a cell phone these are hi tech devices .

Is there any bluetooth adapters for a land line?

Yes that can be done .

  1. I understand that there are bluetooth accessories for TV that can be paired with bluetooth hearing aids. This seems like it could be a huge improvement over wireless headphones. Has anybody found this helpful? Is one brand considered better than another?

Yes there are people here that use them such as the Oticon ConnectLine. I have not felt the need to have them. http://www.oticonusa.com/Oticon/Professionals/professional_products/dual/ConnectLine.html

  1. I’ve seen some of the members here mention a “box” that can be placed on a table to help hear conversations, meetings, etc. Has anybody found this helpful? Does it help control background noise? Going out to dinner or being in a room with background noise is so difficult for my Dad. I hope this could be a solution.

I wear Oticon Dual XW’s and i’d be dammed if i had to use " a “box” that can be placed on a table ." Your solution should only be just a good set of Hearing Aids that work .

  1. It seems like sending the sound into the ear via bluetooth would create better sound quality because there’s no outside noise. Does it work like this? Are there other devices we should test while he has the “free trial”?

Bluetooth aids like Audeo Yes and Oticon Dual can be used as communication devices . They can be paired to other bluetooth devices.

Not sure how you could ever call something “better sound quality because there’s no outside noise.”

Hello Jenny-

I’m a couple weeks into my my first aids - a 50 year old guy with moderate to severe high frequency loss. I have the Phonak Audeo YES IX’s. It pairs easily with my iPhone (using the iCom around the neck accessory.) I also can stream audio from iTunes, and I also have a device for sending audio from my TV via bluetooth to my aids. Here’s my experience: The phone works great, although I’m going to boost the default volume of Bluetooth at my next adjustment. It’s very useful. :o

On the other hand, I find that streaming music or TV directly into my aids is VERY unsatisfactory. :frowning: I have very good natural low frequency hearing, and open fit receivers. The bluetooth only delivers what I would describe as very small, tinny sound. HOWEVER, the aids are so beautifully natural sounding that I now watch TV with my wife and don’t miss a line of dialog, just listening to the speakers in the room (fairly decent speakers) with my hearing aids set to automatic. She used to always complain how loud I would turn it up, but now we both enjoy watching at the same comfortable volume level. So if your father’s loss is similar to mine (basically sloping down pretty linearly to about 80db down at 7K), I think that the reality vs. the expectation of bluetooth for music or TV will be pretty disappointing. However, my enjoyment of music and TV just using my aids and listening to good stereo speakers - including in the car - has surpassed my wildest expectations.

Thanks so much for all the input. Your suggestions and links got me started. I researched the Phonak and Oticon … it’s amazing what’s available. I think that the audiologist in the past have just assumed that an 80+ year old man wouldn’t want to deal with high-tech solutions.

My father went to the audiologist and explained that he was interested in bluetooth ‘accessories’. He ordered the Phonak Blue Tooth hearing aids with a 30-day trial. He also got the TV bluetooth package. All of this is on a trial basis and we hope this is going to be helpful. He also bought an iPhone but can’t use it as a phone … yet!

I learned about an ATT plan for hearing disabled. The plan is 50 per month for the G3 and G3s iPhones (40 for iPhone Classic) and does not include any talk-minutes … only data. Talk-time is billed at .40 per minute. This will give us some time to get the phone working with his new hearing aids before his old cell phone is disconnected.

The new hearing aids should be in next week and I’ll send along his review. I’m really encouraged with all the success stories here! Thanks again!