LE Audio and the Future of Hearing

Ok, I’m a little too obsessed by the prospect of Bluetooth LE Audio, but this is still worth watching. It brings things together quite well.

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Apparently Qualcomm has some chips already certified. First Qualcomm chips get Bluetooth 5.2 certification : hardware

Interesting video. The big question, in my mind, is when will LC3 be readily available in products that we can use? Will all the hearing aid manufacturers jump on board quickly? Or, will they be reluctant to abandon their current technology? Phonak, in particular, has invested a lot in the current tech in their Marvels. Will they dump it to go to LC3 right away, or try to hang on?

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The latest Phonak Marvels use Bluetooth LE.

I found that a very informative video. Thanks for posting the link.

LE adds to battery life dramatically.

Starkey’s been using LE Bluetooth in the Livio products since 2018, and a single charge will run for over 20 hours, and non rechargeable are 7 to 8 days depending on streaming time.

Nobody is currently using the LE Audio described in the video.

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In the video it says that it was the hearing aid manufacturers that drove development of LE Audio. I posted something last year that the lead developer was a Widex employee. The advantages over current technologies are so wide, there is simply no point in hanging on to them.

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First question is when will the standard be finalised and published. It’s supposed to be in the first half of this year, but is that set in stone? The semiconductor builders have said they’ll have silicon available on day 1. Then you have to integrate it into your product. No idea at all, but it doesn’t sound like a small task. The hearing aid manufacturers may not feel there’s any urgency until there are compatible phones available. That probably means Pixel or Samsung, so it depends on where they are in their release cycle.

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