Is it possible to configure/tweak your own digital hearing aid as a geek/nerd?

Like with an Oticon Sumo DM hearing aid with its cables and Genie software for Windows (what version? 7?)? Does it require fancy knowledge and setups?

Thank you in advance. :slight_smile:

I am a newcomer here, recently fitted with Oticon Alta2 Pro aids. I also am interested in learning something about programming my own aids, although my audiologist is not too keen on that idea. She did tell me that Genie is free to those authorized to fit Oticon aids, when I mentioned that I had seen Genie for sale on eBay. But no need to buy, as a Google search easily found the Genie 15.1 software for free download from Oticon at

http://www.oticonus.com/css/

It installs with no license key required and I have entered my audiogram and started going through all of the screens for my aids just to see whet settings are available. Obviously I don’t have the hardware that would be required to actually program the aids, but I don’t really want to do that anyway. Actually, I was disappointed that Oticon does not make detailed information about the settings for an aid available without installing the Genie software.

Larry

Hi I know its nothing to do with the aids that you have. But I self programme my Resound Verso’s. The resound professional site has lots of online tutorials. Whilst biased towards their aids. the tutorials really do show you what each facility does, how to improve and how hearing and aids work.

Very good info even if your not using Resound. Have a look at the e-cademy tutorials here. http://www.resoundpro.com/e-cademy
Regards ian

UOTE=LarryF;126506]I am a newcomer here, recently fitted with Oticon Alta2 Pro aids. I also am interested in learning something about programming my own aids, although my audiologist is not too keen on that idea. She did tell me that Genie is free to those authorized to fit Oticon aids, when I mentioned that I had seen Genie for sale on eBay. But no need to buy, as a Google search easily found the Genie 15.1 software for free download from Oticon at

http://www.oticonus.com/css/

It installs with no license key required and I have entered my audiogram and started going through all of the screens for my aids just to see whet settings are available. Obviously I don’t have the hardware that would be required to actually program the aids, but I don’t really want to do that anyway. Actually, I was disappointed that Oticon does not make detailed information about the settings for an aid available without installing the Genie software.

Larry

Genie is not that difficult to learn and you can get a programmer online pretty easily, I guess. I will be selling one soon (as soon as I get a chance to dig through the big huge pile of outdated stuff I have and get it organized). Programming the devices isn’t that tough. The hard part is getting through to the user that what you are hearing in real time is not necessarily the best indicator of how well the devices are programmed. You have to allow your brain to learn how to process “corrected” sound, and that takes time.

Now, the question is how long? I read some people took half of a year? :confused:

Yep. Most people adjust much quicker than that. They get to a tolerable point within 30 days. But research shows that people get to a “satisfied” point in about 6 weeks on average. And OPTIMAL speech understanding usually takes 3-4 months of full time wear.

What about minor feedbacks, echoes, etc.? Would that be something that people would have to to get used to after wearing analog hearing aids for over 35 years?

Maybe. The most difficult thing to predict is each individual’s PERCEPTION. I have had LONG TIME users that I expected to struggle a lot come back in a week and tell me how amazingly natural the new devices sound. And I have had young, active, very adaptable people with mild losses really struggle to adjust to wearing devices… A lot of time, I think there is significant psychological effect. Its like volume controls and push buttons. If you have had them for 25-30 years, some people can’t get used to the idea of letting the hearing aid automatically adjust itself to its surrounding. They insist on having a manual volume control. But think about it; do people with no hearing loss tug on their ear every time they walk into a loud room? Of course not. But because they have become accustomed to needing to manually raise and lower volume, now they do it out of habit more than anything else a lot of times.

Personally, I think minor feedback is good. It tells me there is likely enough amplification for the person and that the hearing device is working. But if there is so much feedback that it is distracting to nearby people, then its a problem. I had a guy who kept covering his whole ear with his hand and then complaining that his device whistled. I asked him if he walks around with his hand over his ear all the time. He said no. So I asked him if it whistles when his hand is not over his ear. He said no. So I asked what is the problem? Quit putting your hand over your ear. And he came to his next followup and said he hadn’t ever been happier with his aids in 30 years. All it took was to get him to stop focusing on a problem that he was creating in his mind.