If college football is canceled

it’s going to be a very, very long winter. :frowning:

I do enjoy football, usually proball.
With all the politics involved it tends to sour things.

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I agree. Leave politics out of sports. We get enough of it every where else.

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Some of the older of us remember the year they went on strike…I learned that year that i can live with out it…This is a bit different reason, but I can find something else to do on Sunday afternoon…

Monday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday.

Proball, I don’t have to have, take or leave it. Just don’t take away NCAA football please.

I’m not big on college football. Pro football yes. But I think we have more important things to worry about right now than whether we can watch grown men trying to cause permanent brain damage to each other. As entertaining as that may be.

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Do you really believe that or just being :rofl:

I think this is exactly what we need right now.

I think when you look at the obituaries of many pro ballers these days, you often find CTE or dementia mentioned. Intentionally caused or not, it’s definitely something players suffer from as they age, particularly if they played at intensely contact positions. You can’t play against people like Jack Tatum and have your brains come out the other side intact: Jack Tatum - Wikipedia

Just like gladiators and the Christians and the Lions, there’s unfortunately something in us that loves and is excited by violence. I used to be a decent lacrosse midfielder and I played in part for the violent contact. There was nothing more exciting that to run a gauntlet of the opposition and come up with a direct face on shot at goal or being able to scoop up a ball on a dead run coming in on a faceoff. In the Berkeley Lacrosse Club, we played the Air Force Academy back in the early '70’s and they took no prisoners (perhaps particularly because we were regarded as radical long-haired hippies!).

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Well they certainly wouldn’t be playing in a bubble and with everyone lying on top of each other breathing in each other’s face I don’t see how it could possibly work. And yes I honestly believe that head injuries are a major problem in football

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Not for me. Don’t watch any sports on TV. Consider it a waste of my time.

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This is the social forum, right? I thought I might find out who else enjoyed college football and would not like to see it canceled, not who doesn’t.

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I used to be a Raider’s fan years ago. Still enjoy watching the combo of raw power, talent, grace and a tad of luck transpire before my eyes. Still vividly remember the “Immaculate Reception” of Franco Harris!

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I was in 8th grade when the Raider/Pirates played that game. My high school had just won the state championship a few weeks before, so I was all into football. I didn’t get to be apart of it, just a fan cheering them on. That tad of luck is something that can’t be controlled or foreseen and part of the game you love and hate. If you were a Raider fan at that time of the 'immaculate Reception", you hated it.

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Yeah, I definitely hated it. :>) Being picky–they were the Steelers.

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They were the “Steel Curtain” :wink:

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or maybe considering that play, the “Stealers?” :smile:

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Sports are the reason why I refuse to subscribe to cable, satellite, or any live streaming provider. Until they offer me an option not to do so, it’s Prime, Hulu, and Netflix for us. I don’t get any value out of sports on television. I like baseball in person but since that isn’t a thing anymore…

I think to be fair, though, you have to allow negative opinions - seems odd to ask a question or an express an opinion on a community DISCUSSION forum if you’re not prepared to accept negative replies.

I do lament the commercialism that has crept (leapt?) into sports and with college athletics poised to become even more “professional” than it ever has been, I lament the disappearance of amateurism as idealized in “Chariots of Fire.” (although one could say that even in those days you had to be very well-off to have the leisure to indulge yourself in sports at a world-class level).

The motto of my undergraduate school is “mens et manus” - mind and hand. I would say that’s what’s great about participatory sport - engaging both the mind and body in rewarding, invigorating ways.

On the philosophical scale of things, it sounds pretty nasty these days, but both the Greeks and the Romans glorified war for revealing and exalting the true character of a man (person these days!). Only in the extremis of combat could the greatness of a man really shine through and be appreciated (sounds like rubbish by today’s standards-but you can still see some of it in U.S. military ads on TV with the Be All You Can Be theme, etc.). Intensely competitive sports put a lot of stress on the mind and body and it’s amazing when you see Olympian skills shine through-sports put the ideal warrior on display and (some) humans are such that they very much admire that and want to see that sort of show.

Maybe some of the folks who have no use for sports have not very actively participated in any sport themselves outside of a secondary school gym class??? If so, they don’t know what they’ve missed.

I introduced the Greco-Roman ideas about war for the following reason - I vaguely remember the relatively liberal student-run newspaper The Daily Californian celebrating the beginning of another (dismal, in those days) UC-Berkeley football season in the late '60’s by running a full-frontpage quote from their arch nemesis Max Raftery, the (very conservative, even reactionary) State Superintendent of Public Instruction under Gov. Ronald Reagan: (paraphrase here) “Football is the closest we can come to experiencing combat in civilian life.”

I’ve probably clobbered Raftery’s quote from over 50 years ago but at the time I thought it very funny and probably true that both Raftery and his more radical opponents could glorify football as a form of scintillating combat that one shouldn’t miss. I grew up admiring Woody Hayes style football (“3 yards and a cloud of dust”) and knowing that there are only 3 things that can happen with a forward pass (2 of them bad) so it was amazing to see West Coast air raids where the quarterback has thrown the ball to a spot before his receiver has curled out or even turned around. So, yes, there is no sport quite like football for the mental and physical skills required, something as close as one can come to watching combat (for better or worse in real life). Basketball and baseball (and soccer) are usually boring by comparison.

I agree that one should always be prepared for a negative response, but I also think that given it was posted in the social forum it would be gracious of people not to argue sports are stupid. I’d feel the same way if somebody wanted to talk about how they hate sports–not the place to bring up how great they are. Perhaps we need a social–argumentative section for contrary folks.

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