ICom and ATT Cordless

Greetings,

My Dad just got Phonak aids and an ICom. Thanks to everybody on this board we have been introduced to some fantastic new technology. My Dad has not been able to hear this well in years and is so thrilled.

We have paired his ICom to his iPhone (3Gs) and to the TV (included in ICom kit). Fantastic!

This afternoon I was working on pairing the ICom with a new BlueTooth Cordless (EP5632). The ICom and the Cordless pair well however I can only have the cordless or the iPhone paired at a single time. It’s like one “steps on” the other. When I pair one device the other is disabled.

I’m confused and the instructions with the ICom don’t go into any of the technical data. Can ICom only handle one “talk device” at a time? One bluetooth device at a time?

I’ll appreciate any thoughts … it’s getting a little frustrating!

Again … thanks to everybody on this board for getting us this far. I’m so excited for my Dad!

Jenny

Yes, the iCom can only be actively paired with one phone at a time. It’s a common complaint about the iCom. One thing I believe you can do with the ATT phone is have your cell phone paired with the ATT’s base so that calls from the cell ring on the ATT phone. Then you can answer both with the iCom.

Thanks JoeSC. That explains the issue with pairing two phones. Does this mean that the iCom only allows one bluetooth device at a time? For example, can I have the computer paired and the iPhone paired? Or, does it allow only one device at a time?

Also, are there products like the iCom that allow multiple phones/devices to pair? We’re on a trial for the iCom and could always swap it for a different “model”.

This is really fantastic technology and opening some great possibilities for my Dad. I’m a little jealous of some of the capabilities!

Thanks again to all …

Jenny

I believe you can pair up to eight devices with the iCom. But only one can be active and in use at a time (which makes sense since you don’t want music playing while on a telephone call). Phone pairings have priority over all others. The manual I believe tells you exactly the priority levels of the different inputs.

To give you an example, I listen to music from my computer using bluetooth through the iCom, while the iCom is also paired with the ATT phone. When a call comes in, the iCom will chirp to notify me that there is a call. If I accept it by pressing the iCom button, it will switch to the phone call. When the call is done and I press the iCom button to end the call, it will switch back to the music from the computer automatically. The only bummer is that the music isn’t paused while your on the call. You won’t hear it on the call, but when you switch back, it will be still playing as if you had been listening to it all the time.

There isn’t another product that can provide the functionality and features of the iCom that would work with your aids as the iCom does with multiple phone pairings. Although there are regular bluetooth headsets that allow multiple phone pairings.

There was talk in another post in this forum of someone who complained to Phonak about the multiple phone pairing issue, and claimed that Phonak stated that it might be added in a future software update.

I’ve heard this said often but have yet to see it demonstrated. The iCom manual says it’s a one-on-one device.

Just to be clear about this :confused: do you mean you are running your PC audio through the 3.5mm jack on the bottom of the iCom?? If not please explain step by step how you accomplish this. Thanks Joe.

From the manual, page 58 in the troubleshooting section:
“iCom can be paired to a maximum of 8 different Bluetooth devices. If the internal memory is full, new pairings will overwrite previous pairings.”

Also from the manual :
The following summarizes the priority given to different audio sources:
1 Bluetooth phone call
2 Audio jack
3 FM receiver
4 Bluetooth stereo headset

The key thing to remember is that pairing means that the iCom and your other bluetooth devices have negotiated with each other provide permission to communicate with each other. It needs to be completed only once for each device you wish to use with your iCom.

Maintaining an active connection and connecting to each other is a different thing.

Just to be clear about this :confused: do you mean you are running your PC audio through the 3.5mm jack on the bottom of the iCom?? If not please explain step by step how you accomplish this. .

There are several ways I do this. I have several different bluetooth devices. Obviously a bluetooth ATT phone as described to JennyB, a Samsung MP3 player that has bluetooth built in, and a bluetooth adaptor (Jabra A120s). Each of these is paired with the iCom. But only one active connection is maintained at a time. The bluetooth adaptor I plug into my computer’s 3.5mm sound output port (I hate using a cord, too restrictive), and listen to music, video and whatever other sounds I have output from my compuer via bluetooth. Since I’ve paired the iCom with the phone, the priority settings mentioned above are still in place. The iCom will connect to whatever is active based on the priority setting.

As I explained to JennyB here’s a typical scenario:
I listen to music from my computer using bluetooth through the iCom, while the iCom is also paired with the ATT phone. When a call comes in, the iCom will trigger my hearing aids to chirp to notify me that there is a call. If I accept it by pressing the iCom button, it will switch to the phone call. When the call is done and I press the iCom button to end the call, it will switch back to the music from the computer automatically. The only bummer is that the music isn’t paused while your on the call. You won’t hear it on the call, but when you switch back, it will be still playing as if you had been listening to it all the time. If instead you use the audio cable, the same thing will happen, since the phone has the highest priority setting of all devices.

I do the same with my MP3 player using bluetooth. The key thing to remember, two devices of the same type can’t actively be working at the same time. So if I had my MP3 player and my bluetooth adaptor both on at the same time, the iCom will only stream from the first device it was active with. Same with phones, if you have a cell phone and a landline phone both using bluetooth, only one of them could be active at the same time. It a common complaint for the iCom, but not unusual for bluetooth devices.

Hope this gives you some clarity

Hi,

Ive been using an icom with my mobile phone for the last 8 months and think its a fantastic piece of equipment :slight_smile:

Today I purchased a bluetooth dongle for my PC and would like to listen to my music files on my pc via bluetooth to my icom.

How exactly have you guys managed to listen to your audio files from your pc to your icom?

I have succesfully paired my pc to my icom but when I play an audio file via windows media player the speakers blare out the music. If I turn volume control down on the speakers this also turns down the audio volume I recieve through the icom.

Am I doing something stupid? Please help!

You need to change the audio output options to the port where you have your bluetooth dongle connected.

MAke sure you also select headphone profile as it is higher quality than headset. If you need to use skype however the headset profile is better as that includes the microphone on the icom as well.

I would like to use iCom to listen to audio over bluetooth on my iMac running Boot Camp on Windows XP. I have successfully used it with my iPhone and Mac OS X but I can’t get it to connect to Windows XP. I am stuck at the pairing process and can’t get the iCom to show as connected, and it doesn’t show up as an audio output device anywhere.

Anyone with experience on this issue? I only got iCom to listen to music, I can’t hear the phone at all.

It sounds like you need Blue-tooth adaptor drivers that would give you the full Blue-tooth support for the iMac Blue-tooth adaptor to work with Windows. If the Blue-tooth is built in to the iMac, you will have to contact Apple for Windows drivers for it … Good luck. If it is an add-on device, you will have to contact the manufacturer of the Blue-tooth adaptor for Windows drivers … Good luck. Keep in mind that you are running Boot Camp to “boot” into Windows, therefore not loading the Apple OS drivers for system devices. Unless that device has a generic driver integrated into Windows, unlikely for a Blue-tooth adaptor, you must install those drivers to allow it to work.

I am using a Bluetooth mouse and keyboard which work just fine so I know it is not the drivers. I think there is something I am missing to enable the use of the iCom as an audio device, I am still new to Windows.

Anyway I have noticed that whenever I try to pair the iCom with more than one device (phone and computer) it messes up the settings and I have to delete the iCom from the paired devices or turn Bluetooth off on one of the devices.

I am keeping iCom paired directly to my phone and playing music through it. It’s the best solution I have found.

Do not rule out drivers so quickly. Check with the manufacturer of the computer if it is a built-in Blue-tooth adaptor, or the manufacturer of the device if it is an add-on card or adaptor. The drivers may work just fine for the keyboard and mouse, but not support the function that you are trying to use it for. Blue-tooth is not a complete all-in-one solution, different drivers support different functions and you must have the proper driver or device to support the function you want to utilize.

You said it yourself “I think there is something I am missing to enable the use of the iCom as an audio device” … the iCom is a communications device, NOT a keyboard or mouse. Keyboards and mice Transmit signals, the iCom Receives signals. Check the drivers.