How to Protect Your Hearing on the Plane

The latest from our own @dave_copithorne

I just mute my hearing aids and leave them in my ears. Makes for a very significant reduction in noise. Probably works best with closed fittings though.

1 Like

Frankfurt airport now waiting for my 3rd international flight 26 hours, 3 flights, 4 airports. NC headphones still in carry-on. So far, my new M90s with power domes far far better. Streaming, movies, hearing the flight attendants and the announcements better than ever. Playing around with custom settings depending on seat. Wow!

1 Like

I don’t really understand this thread. Is this for people with normal hearing? If your hearing aids are properly programmed with correct MPO settings and adjustive compression at the top end, then everything should be comfortable. It is for me on a plane.

1 Like

Re-read the article. Dave addressed hearing aids specifically.

1 Like

By muting my hearing aids I am using the fittings essentially as ear plugs. If the vent is small or closed they work very well as ear plugs. My custom molds with small vents work the best. If you don’t need to talk to anybody, or want to sleep, it gives me a welcome reduction in noise level in the plane. I have tried various setting on my KS8 aids, but nothing comes close to simply muting them for comfort.

1 Like

Interesting. Actually my last ride in a jet was decades ago, a million-hour 707 full of loose rivets buzzing. But 5 years back I went up in a WWII B-17: 3,600 horsepower propeller bomber, three big Studebaker (and one Wright) Radials without mufflers. That trip I wore my shooter(lawnmowing) muffs.

It was loud but not as bad as I’d feared. On the long strip with no bombs or excess fuel it maybe only used 2,000HP to get off and 1,000HP to cruise the scenic loop of the island. There is ZERO padding inside a B-17, however somebody had gone over the rivets because it was much less buzz than the tired 707.

Agree that maybe-85dB of jet-scream plus vibration and thin bad air in a jetliner is stressful.