How many consider studying ASL?

#1

I have moderate to severe loss in my left and severe to profound in my right. I studied American Sign Language in college (years and years ago) but never had much use for it as no one in my family has hearing loss at my level and I knew of no one to use it with. As I love languages in general like Italian and Chinese, I’ve never had a strong desire for ASL. At 44, I’m now reconsidering the idea as my hearing has slipped in my right ear. Still on the fence about it though as classes near me are hard to find and I’m not sure how easily it would be to learn. Has anyone here debated about studying ASL or do you plan to stick with assisted hearing devices?

Laura

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#2

I learned enough sign language at one time to roughly communicate some words and spell words I could not sign, in order to communicate with Deaf students at a camp, so I’m not an expert but have had some exposure.

Do you plan to become culturally Deaf, or to work with the Deaf? If not I would not do it.

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#3

Culturally deaf - no. I’m just as learning disabled as I am deaf - probably more so - I don’t consider myself culturally learning disabled. I’m Sicilian-American. I don’t define myself by my disabilities. Without my hearing aids I’m at a loss to communicate and I’ve always wondered about whether knowing ASL might make things easier if my hearing continues to worsen. I’m curious how many people, if anyone, has tried learning Sign Language as well.

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#4

Culturally Deaf do not consider hearing “loss” a disability. Outside of Deaf culture, I don’t know where ASL would benefit you.

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#5

I don’t see where learning ASL would be a negative… at the hospital I worked at they were always having classes and encouraging anyone to sign up.

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#6

I’m about to finish my third ASL class. It was in the first that I discovered my hearing loss and Meniers disease. No place near me offers anything further, but there are a lot of Deaf events in the area that I hope to continue attending. My hearing isn’t all that bad, but two years ago it was perfect, so it’s likely it will continue to decline. I don’t want to be in the position to have to learn ASL once I have little other choice.
If only I could convince my partner to start taking classes! I think he is in denial about my hearing loss.

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#7

I’m certainly weighing it right now but honestly, I’m more interested in Romance and Asian languages. Unless you have someone to use it with, it seems hard to continue. Is there even deaf television? If there was, what would they have on it and would you watch? Maybe at some point I’d learn but like you, I find nothing near me.

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#8

I am learning ASL. I was deaf from 8 to 22 and was forced to learn how to lip-read. I now wear aids and can hold conversations normally. However, I work at and attend a church with deaf people, as well as teach their children and deaf children. I’m learning it for them and myself. I’m without hearing aids right now and ASL sure would be nice! I could talk to my Mom in ASL, lol.

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#9

It’s when I don’t have my hearing aids (broke, off to repairs) that I ponder learning. Even if my Judo teacher and I could communicate more clearly with Sign it would help. I’m sure he’d pick up a few signs…

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#10

There are several people in my ASL class who are also taking Spanish. They seem to do fine learning both languages and don’t get confused because of the difference between a visual language and an auditory/written one.
The Deaf events are how I’m hoping to keep up with my ASL.

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#12

I’ll learn ASL because there’s no reason to think my hearing won’t continue to go the way it’s been going and learning ASL seems to be something positive I can do. I don’t know if it’ll significantly change my life, but I hope it’ll open some more doors.

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#13

I know this thread is quite old, but I’m still going to comment anyway. I took ASL years and years ago, getting to the point where I was almost fluent. I haven’t used it, other than in brief bits through work a few years ago, in many, many years, so the few signs and grammar aspects that I can remember are rusty. I think I’m going to start taking ASL again in the fall. Granted, my hearing loss isn’t terrible at present, but I would rather re-learn ASL now, while I can still communicate with ease, than wait until/if things progress in such a way that understanding oral communication becomes difficult. My 3-year-old daughter has already learned some basic signs, and my 1-year-old son is also showing some interest, so I think it would be a fun “extra” language for my family! My husband’s even shown some interest. And personally, I think that if my hearing ever does progress to the point where understanding basic speech is difficult even with hearing aids, I will be very, VERY thankful to have learned it. In years past, I’ve had friends in the Deaf community, so re-learning ASL might open up that door again. On a different note, it would also set me apart from other health care professionals in my region, so that if my hearing worsens, I will have some extra skills that may translate into improved hireability. A girl can hope.

The other thing I intend to do is to take a speech-reading class as soon as possible. Unfortunately, there isn’t one in my region presently. Our local branch of the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association is just training some members to teach speech-reading classes, so once speech-reading classes become available in my area, you’d better believe I will be enrolling!!! I figure the more communication/coping skills I can learn, the better. Plus, the ability to speech-read helps even those with “normal” hearing in many situations, so it certainly can’t hurt me.

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#14

I always wanted to learn LSQ (one of the two sign language of my country) andmy cousin is an interpreter. Her ex-husband is deaf and the primary language of her two child is LSQ. I will take classes in september.

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