How do my vents work in my earmolds?

I have vents in the earmolds that I wear but I’m not too sure of the size of them.

As I can hear quite a bit of low frequencies sounds without my hearing aids, would I be getting more low frequency sounds in my ears then without any vents in my earmolds?

These are my first set of hearing aids so I’m not too sure how vents work.

I have been researching vents but I can only find out about ‘low frequencies rolling off’ though the vents which I do not understand.

Many Thanks.

The primary reason for a vent is to allow bone-conducted sounds generated by your own voice to escape the ear canal, otherwise your voice will sound echo-like, as if you’re speaking into a bottle or tube. The larger the vent, the more low-frequency output from the hearing aid will leak out and not reach your eardrum. But large vents also reduce the maximum available high-frequency gain due to feedback issues.

My response comes from almost 5 yrs of wearing hearing aids from the view of an engineer (acoustical and electronic)

Vents are frequency sensitive. Low frequencies with a longer wave form, can leak in to to smallest space. So external low tones can leak into your eardrum if there is any space between the ear mold or dome and the ear canal. The higher the frequency the shorter the wave form and the less likely to leak in or out of an opening in an ear mold. So a vent allows a normallizing of low frequency sounds. When sounds are broadcast directly from a speaker (RIC) to your ear drum it has the best chance of not being changed in any way. So this is a favore way to fit hearing aids. Not all losses and all ear canals make this a possibility or practicality.

In my hearing loss chart shown below, the right ear hears better and is more natural with a slight vent. The left ear on the other hand, needs a good seal and no vent. The key is where does the low frequency loss begin. If I use a sealed ear mold on the right ear, I depend on the programming to compensate for the complete seal. So the vent makes it easier to be satisfied in most hearing environments.

About you hearing loss, A slight vent might be desirable. You can modify the vent action by inserting lambs wool in the hole to suit your preference. My better solution to the question is to make my own DIY ear molds and gradually file away a small portion of the wall of the mold until I am satisfied, gradually over a weeks time. I can easily do this with DIY ear mold kits that I buy from: http://HearingGreen.net. The kits range in price from $14.77 for 4 ear molds t0 $24.77 for 24 canal ear molds. Price includes Priority USPS 1-3 day shipping. They are available in a choice of skin colors.

The depth of the ear mold has a huge effect on all of these factors. Generally, the deeper the better and more natural the result and the less tendency to cause feed back. These flexible molds eliminate the problem of the hard lab ear molds.

I like being in control and know what sounds good. I hope this was helpful.

Freq R- L
250 45 35
500 50 40
750 50 40
1000 50 40
1500 65 50
2000 80 60
3000 90 65
4000 90 70
6000 85 70
8000 85 80

— Updated —

My response comes from almost 5 yrs of wearing hearing aids from the view of an engineer (acoustical and electronic)

Vents are frequency sensitive. Low frequencies with a longer wave form, can leak in to to smallest space. So external low tones can leak into your eardrum if there is any space between the ear mold or dome and the ear canal. The higher the frequency the shorter the wave form and the less likely to leak in or out of an opening in an ear mold. So a vent allows a normallizing of low frequency sounds. When sounds are broadcast directly from a speaker (RIC) to your ear drum it has the best chance of not being changed in any way. So this is a favore way to fit hearing aids. Not all losses and all ear canals make this a possibility or practicality.

In my hearing loss chart shown below, the right ear hears better and is more natural with a slight vent. The left ear on the other hand, needs a good seal and no vent. The key is where does the low frequency loss begin. If I use a sealed ear mold on the right ear, I depend on the programming to compensate for the complete seal. So the vent makes it easier to be satisfied in most hearing environments.

About you hearing loss, A slight vent might be desirable. You can modify the vent action by inserting lambs wool in the hole to suit your preference. My better solution to the question is to make my own DIY ear molds and gradually file away a small portion of the wall of the mold until I am satisfied, gradually over a weeks time. I can easily do this with DIY ear mold kits that I buy from: http://HearingGreen.net. The kits range in price from $14.77 for 4 ear molds t0 $24.77 for 24 canal ear molds. Price includes Priority USPS 1-3 day shipping. They are available in a choice of skin colors.

The depth of the ear mold has a huge effect on all of these factors. Generally, the deeper the better and more natural the result and the less tendency to cause feed back. These flexible molds eliminate the problem of the hard lab ear molds.

I like being in control and know what sounds good. I hope this was helpful.

Freq R- L
250 45 35
500 50 40
750 50 40
1000 50 40
1500 65 50
2000 80 60
3000 90 65
4000 90 70
6000 85 70
8000 85 80

Do have a financial interest in Hearing Green?

— Updated —

Do have a financial interest in Hearing Green?

No, use vents unless there is some unusual contraindication. Things will sound more natural and not “stopped up” if you have a vent. Your loss should allow for a 1mm vent or perhaps even larger.

Vents equalize the air pressure in your ear canal with ambient conditions. They allow your eardrum to vibrate freely and, if large enough, allow for non-amplified low frequencies to be heard naturally.