Hearing Aids that use size 13 battery

I’m looking at purchasing a new pair of hearing aids and am finding that most are rechargeable now. I don’t want this for a few reasons:

  1. I can’t charge them when back country camping
  2. I will forget the charger when travelling. But pharmacies always have hearing aid batteries.
  3. Batteries are smaller and easier to travel with.
  4. I need to hear to work. If for some reason I don’t get a proper charge (eg. accidentally disconnected the charger) and they die at work then that would be bad, especially in the field where I can’t charge. Right now it’s just a simple battery change and done.

Because I connect to various devices (phone, laptop for online meetings etc.) I’d prefer a hearing aid that uses a size 13 battery. My current hearing aids use a size 13 and the battery lasts 5-7 days depending on the amount of streaming. Also I already have all these 13 batteries and really don’t want to switch back to 312.

So which bluetooth hearing aids are available in size 13 battery? It’s not a feature I can filter by in the hearing aid list.

I was going to get the Oticon More but the 312 battery size killed that. I currently have Resound so might be easier to stay with that brand if accessories are still compatible. But I found the casing to be very cheaply built.

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A lot of BTE Aids use Size 13 batteries.

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I am using Phonak Nadia M90 BTE with 13 batteries. I tried rechargables back in the day when they did not use Li-Ion and they did not make it one day. However, there were interchangble with 13 and I just started using plain batteries. I agree with all your comments. Advantage of rechargable is that they are better with moisture, since the compartment is sealed.

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The latest Resound ONE with size 13 battery has been great for me.

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You should definitely also look at Resound One. You can get them in 13 size. I have had Resounds for about 10 years and find the cases are ok. The Resound Ones sound very good to me. They use the same accessories as earlier models, although it must depend how old your’s are.

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I don’t trust the rechargeable to hold a full charge 3-4 years from now so I’m looking elsewhere as well. But just for reference you can use a portable battery pack like you do for your phone to charge your rechargeable hearing aids.

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I figure I’ll send them in at 2 years and 10 months for new batteries. Then a couple months later I get new aids, and the ones I have now become backups. (I am eligible for new at 3 years. I’l be watching to see if I should wait for newer tech to come out though. December and May are the months as the new contracts let out in Apr and Nov.)

WH

I did consider a portable battery but it’s still something I could lose. And depending on length of camping trip and capacity of the portable battery it would also lose power at some point.

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I have a battery pack attached to the charger case that give 5 solid charges and 90% of a sixth. Another battery pack would be gravy. Or a solar charger.

WH

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My resounds are 4 years old. The side casing popped off when closing the battery door one day. They’re awful with moisture in the summer which I’ve never had a problem with before. But given the poor casing that probably explains that. And the small piece of plastic that keeps the battery door closed popped off once too. Luckily I found it and was easy enough to put back on but pieces shouldn’t fly off like that. It was all the left hearing aid, was sent for repairs but it still isn’t great.

I agree. You can carry a few years worth of batteries for that same weight as the charging case and a battery pack.

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I got new Phonak Paradise HAs in September that takes 13 batteries.

Rechargeables aren’t for everyone. I originally received rechargeable HAs and hated them. I have a cros in one ear and the charge only lasted 12 hours because it’s streaming all the time. I’m over 70 and was worried what would happen in an emergency, like if I needed to go to the hospital. I wouldn’t be able to hear any questions or explanations. My audi is a big fan of rechargeable HAs, cheaper and better for the environment, but she understood my concern.

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Neither cheaper nor better for the environment is obvious to me. Take size 13 batteries that last a week. That’s roughly 100 batteries per year. You can get them for 25 cents each, or $25 for a year’s supply (Costco is cheaper). If you need to spend $150 to have a spare charger ready for use, that’s the equivalent of 6 years’ worth of batteries, and you may not even be using those hearing aids and that charger in 6 years.

Size 13’s are listed as weighing 0.83 grams. Round up to a gram, and you get 100 grams of used batteries per year, less than 4 ounces in a year. Then there’s the packaging, some of which can be recycled. Balance that against the packaging for a charger, and the packaging needed if it needs to be sent back for warranty repairs, not an uncommon situation from what one reads here.

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the Oticon Xceed and Resound Enzos carry that option if you’re in a range like some of us :wink: I’m still keen on those as a good compromise for my mom too since they also have a 675 option if her hearing loss cuts off more

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Very good points. I use twice as many batteries as you because I stream all day from one aid to the other. And they are in my ears from 7am-midnight most days. I do recycle all my batteries.

I imagine it depends on a number of factors, including how the portable batteries are disposed of, how the energy to power the rechargeables is created, how often you need to need to replace a recharchable or its built in battery compared to a portable battery-powered HA. Much like cars EV vs internal combustion engines.

Personally, I wouldn’t go to an audiologist service provider unless they discussed and were prepared to supply all the options.

I have KS10’s rechargeable which I love, also Resounds size 13 battery, the latter supplied by NHS UK. Had the Resounds for 5 years and never had a problem with the battery doors. The reason for that is, both aids have been replaced at least 2 or 3 times due to moisture problems. Leaving them on a bathroom shelf while taking a shower, or picking them up with a wet hand or a couple of rain drops. Although I think the IP rating must be pretty low on that particular model.

She did. We decided to try the rechargeable ones first. Within a week we had discussed the problems I was having I she put in the order for battery ones.

I am with Lydia C. on this. It is a bit disheartening to find so many of the most advanced HAs are not available with real batteries, only rechargeable.
Like her, I enjoy being in the backcountry for days at a time, and a rechargeable simply is not practical. Yes, I know, and have a small solar charger, but it takes up a whole lot more room than batteries and is not nearly as practical. I often travel by MC and again, batteries are far more convenient than taking along a charger. And a big reason is batteries are far more reliable and replaceable.
So, a shout out to the manufacturers: produce the best you have to be compatible with batteries.

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