Hearing Aid Settings - Conductive vs Sensorineural


#1

My Auntie has a purely conductive loss on her left side and a sensorineural loss on her right side.

Her left ear is roughly 60db and her right ear is roughly 40db.

What she would like to know, is whether her hearing aids would respond in different ways because of having different hearing loss in each ear?

She wears NHS Siemens hearing aids.


#2

Different ways how?

Conductive gain targets and different than sensorineural gain targets.


#3

I’ve just been researching it.

Conductive losses require more gain so I believe they will be set up differently to a sensorineural loss.


#4

#5

Yup, that’s right. With a purely conductive loss, the inner ear is still functioning as it should and the dynamic range is the same, you just need to overcome the conductive element. With sensorineural dynamic range is reduced.

Generally, individuals with purely conductive hearing losses have an easier time with amplification than individuals with sensorineural hearing loss.


#6

Thank you for explaining it to me.

Would you know why, when I put her loss in to my Phonak software, the compression for her conductive side is all 1. For her other side, it’s all 2.something like 2.3?! :slight_smile:

EDIT: Just thought the compression might be down to her dynamic range.


#7

Yeah, you got it. Conductive loss is basically just shifting the sound window whereas sensorineural loss is squishing it.

As for what amount of compression is ideal, that’s still a bit up-in-the air, research-wise. Try flipping back and forth between DSL and NAL prescriptions and you’ll see a significant change.


#8

You’re a star! I fully understand it now and can pass on the information to my Auntie.