HA Recommendation?

I figured I should post my hearing exam results to get other opinions on HA options. The diagnosis is mild-profound SNHL in both ears.

Left Freq Right
25 250 25
55 500 45
60 1k 60
70 2k 70
75 3k 75
110 4k+ 110

I’m wearing GN Canta 7 currently, and my word recognition is 80% with them. My audi is recommending the Widex Inteo for the frequency transposition. From postings on this site and others, it doesn’t sound like the Inteo is very useful or popular.

My situation, I’m working in an IT office with a lot of high tech equipment and have young kids with high pitched voices. I’m also interested in bluetooth connectivity, and high technology. I’m looking at the Epoq, Excelia, Naidia and possibly the Azure.

What does everyone here think and why?

The Inteo’s frequency compression quite simply blends the higher (inaudible otherwise) frequencies with lower (audible frequencies), causing significant distortion. At it’s launch we were explicitly told by Widex that the transposition has NOT been designed for improving speech inteligibility, but rather for environmental awareness.

The Naida’s SoundRecover (High frequency compression) has however been designed for improving speech discrimination and is thus more useful. 80% is still pretty good for your loss and you may be better off with Exelia’s due to the more advanced features and the iCom which allows Bluetooth and FM connectivity. You should really arrange to try both (naida and Exelia )if possible and see which benefits you the most.

Hmm, it looks like the Naida’s are the only one’s with SoundRecover, and it looks like the Naida can also use the iCom. So I’m trying to figure out what makes the Exelia better.

Naida has: – Exelia Has:
SoundRecover –
Whistleblock – WhistleBlock
SoundFlow – SoundFlow
Noiseblock – Noiseblock
windblock – WindBlock
Real Ear Sound – RealEar Sound
QuickSync – QuickSync
– SoundRelax
– VoiceZoom
– EchoBlock

So for the extra three features the Exelia has, Sound Relax seems to give the same function as Noiseblock, VoiceZoom is a directional mic, which every good HA has, and EchoBlock is solving a problem I don’t think I’ve every had in precisely the locations they were pointing out (Church, Meeting Halls, and Arenas).

So for what seems like three useless features, and the lack of SoundRecover, we’re supposed to pay a thousand more? Seems like the decision is made for me. Unless I’m interpreting the features incorrectly?

If not, I’ll just have to choose between the Naida and the Epoq.

So for what seems like three useless features, and the lack of SoundRecover, we’re supposed to pay a thousand more? Seems like the decision is made for me. Unless I’m interpreting the features incorrectly?

There are significant differences in how these features are applied between Exelia and Naida. For example the Soundflow Premium is a 4 program automatic the can blend unlimited programs between (speech-in-quiet, Speech-in-Noise, Comfort in Noise as well as Music). For example if you’re in a bar with music playing the aids could for example design a blend of 60% speech-in-noise, 20% comfort-in-noise and 20% Music (just an arbitrary example as it depends on the situation and your position in the situation).In this blend it would then also incorporate adaptive levels of EchoBlock (reduces interference of reverberant backgrounds), NoiseBlock (in 20 channels - decreases modulated noise - eg fans, A/C’s traffic etc - relative to speech frequencies - much slower than SoundRelax and is aimed at optimizing speech in noise where sound relax is aimed at comfort of sudden loud noises), WindBlock, SoundRelax (significantly improves comfort of sudden loud impact noises without affecting speech or sound quality) as well as Amount of VoiceZoom (which is a 33 Channel adaptive directional microphone able to suppress the 33 loudest sounds behind you even as they move around).

The Exelia is a 20 channel device and also has ZoomControl (accessible through the myPilot remote control) that allows you to Zoom the aids in a specific direction using all four microphones (2 on each aid). It does this by linking the mics and changing the configuration depending on which direction you choose to Zoom. For Example a passenger in a Car might want to Zoom left to hear the driver instead of the windscreen (as most hearing aids’s directionality is normally forward focusing). To understand how this works you need to understand that adaptive directionality works by using two omni-directional mics - one front and one rear - where an electronic timing difference is introduced to create a polar plot (which has a certain notch - or maximum reduction point - depending on the loudest noise source). The ZoomControl function in the above example the left front mic would become the right front mic, the right front mic would become the right rear mic, the left rear mic would become the left front mic and the right rear mic would become the left rear mic. It then streams all the sound picked up this way in real time to both aids, making you hear mainly only what is happening on the left. This would essentially be the same as turning your head completely to the left, while in actual fact you’re still looking forward. The same can be achieved for any other direction (forward, left, right, back) depending on your selection on the remote control.

The Naida has only single band adaptive forward facing directional mic which can reduce only the one loudest moving sound source behind the wearer. It also has no ZoomControl. The Naida V is also a 16 channel device with 16 channel NoiseBlock (So less detailed reduction of modulated noise relative to speech). It also only has SoundFlow Advanced (Speech-in-Quiet, Speech-in-noise, Comfort in Noise) and is unable to correctly identify Music automatically(will identify it as noise and consequently reduce it using NoiseBlock). As such you’ll require a manual music program to overcome this if music is important to you. It also does not have the same comfort with loud impact noises (think dishes clanging, doors slamming etc) or improved speech understanding in reverberant situations (think large tiled areas or metal sheds etc). It does however have SoundRecover and all the features which profound users would need (they often want grunt rather than comfort features and can feel “cut-off” if they had to use the Exelia’s extensive features). The Naida is also significantly larger than the Exelia, making it less cosmetically appealing than the Exelia.

Both aids are extremely good in what they do and as such you should try them both if possible to see which YOU prefer.

Thanks for the detailed explanation!

I’m hoping anything now would be better than my existing Canta 7’s, which I believe has 14 bands and 4 programs.

A question on ZoomControl. Does it require the remote? I’d think it could be something that can be done programmatically by the aids. My understanding of the remote is it’s about $400, and it’s something I’d probably lose (as I often lose my sunglasses), whereas the Icom you would leave around your neck.

My current aids don’t have a volume control, as it’s set by the audi, and I’m not sure why you’d want a volume control on hearing aids, Kind of reminds me of the old analog days. I just have a music program (which I consider a loud program) as one of my program options.

Hi Joesc, Any of the new generation aids should sound better than your old aids.

The ZoomControl does require a remote as you cannot set in in a program (which would have been nice although it would have limited you to chossing a single direction or otherwise have 4 programs - one for each direction).

The volume control adds more flexibility to suit different users, some want control, other’s don’t. If you don’t need or want to use it you don’t have too as it is very automatic.

abit about the canta…
the canta line dates back to the beggining of the digital era… It was launch a real while ago… I would expect most value instrument would outperform the canta… regarless of the number of channels… I would go as far as an Extra or an Una being a superior instrument than a canta…

If you wish to remain with in the brand - azure is the instrument…
But most audis would agree. that Phonak has generally better products than
GN- i would think you would love this products

It kind of begs the question, why they didn’t combine the remote function into the ICom. Would seem like a no brainer. AFAIK, they both cost the same. :confused:

Wow, at the time I bought my Canta 7 (3 years ago), it was positioned by my Audi as a mid range product. Disappointed that it was actually considered a low end. Good to know. Thanks

it is consider now as value instrument…
It was probably mid price then…

I would think either the Pixel would replace the canta 7 in terms of positioning…

Well, just talked to my Audi today, and she told me that she thought the Naida SP would be too powerful for me on the low end. The recommendation was for the Exelia P. I’m kind of surprised at that, as I would think you can lower the gain on the low frequencies? Does that sound right to the other audi’s here? I was kind of hoping to make use of the SoundRecover feature of the Naida.

My audiogram again:
Left Freq Right
25 250 25
55 500 45
60 1k 60
70 2k 70
75 3k 75
110 4k+ 110

Well, just talked to my Audi today, and she told me that she thought the Naida SP would be too powerful for me on the low end. The recommendation was for the Exelia P. I’m kind of surprised at that, as I would think you can lower the gain on the low frequencies? Does that sound right to the other audi’s here? I was kind of hoping to make use of the SoundRecover feature of the Naida.

My audiogram again:
Left Freq Right
25 250 25
55 500 45
60 1k 60
70 2k 70
75 3k 75
110 4k+ 110
03-29-2008 04:02 AM

Technically the Naida UP is too powerful, but I have fitted a client with similar lows to yours with great benefit with a Naida UP. His highs were much worse (1.5 - 80dB and nothing above it). You would need a large (3mm +) vent and the lows can indeed be reduced. The Exelia has some incredible processing though and another client also similar to yours (inh highs) did just as well (and probably better in BG noise) with Exelia P’s - so either aid is worth a try. For you I’d have to say you’d probably be better off starting with Exelia’s and maybe trial Naida’s after.

I was thinking of the Naida SP. I’m not disappointed to get the Exelia, as it does have more features. But if I’m missing something because of the supposedly dead areas then I’d want to try to recover it.

Something I didn’t know was that on my current hearing aids, the previous fitter didn’t even bother to program in the 4K+ ranges. Don’t know if it was because the current technology couldn’t handle my loss or what. I was surprised to say the least.

by the way SIGA will be soon release now
seems like a great mid price instrument