Fitting Ranges for BTE aids?

I noticed that the fitting range for BTE aids will sometimes have a low range of 0 DB and other times have a low range of 30, 40, or 50 DB depending on which manufacturer is publishing the specifications.

For example Sonic Inovations indicates a fitting range of between 0-100 DB for their Balance BTE aid.

http://www.sonici.com/literaturedownloads/5000763.B.pdf

Phonak on the other hand indicates a fitting range of between 30-105 DB for their Savia Art 211 dSZ BTE aid.

http://www.phonak.com/com_027_0027-xx_savia_art_product_information.pdf

What is Phonak trying to indicate with lower fitting range of 30 DB and a mild to moderate hearing loss? Are they trying to indicate that these hearing aids are not designed for a person with only high frequency loss?

My guess is that such hearing aid that covers from 30 to 100 does not have expansion. A hearing ait that covers from 0 to say 80 has to have some sort of soft squelch or expansion

Admin may be able to let us know


OG KUSH MARIJUANA STRAIN

Hope Admin picks up on this because I too would like the answer. I range from 20 to 105 and a lot the aids that might be appropriate for my higher frequency loss (Naida, Sumo DM, Xtreme) have ranges that start at 50 or 60.

Hope Admin picks up on this because I too would like the answer. I range from 20 to 105 and a lot the aids that might be appropriate for my higher frequency loss (Naida, Sumo DM, Xtreme) have ranges that start at 50 or 60.

I suspect Phonak does have expansion and that the fitting range is an indication of optimal audiological suitability (and tends to quote aids that can take both standard moulds and slim tubes on their moulded fitting range) rather than excluding certain losses. For instance I recently fitted a Naida III to a client with a dead ear on one side and a High frequency dead range in his usable ear (20db - 250-500Hz, 30db - 1Khz, 65dB -1,5kHZ, 80- 2Khz and then no response above). After extensive contact with Phonak re suitability (As I really wanted to see how effective Frequency compression (SoundRecover) would be for this client who is not interested in Cochelar implant, but finds little benefit with traditional amplification in his good ear), I proceeded to fit him in his better ear only using a Large (4mm) vent. The device was able to match the target (REM - NL-1) extremely well after turning off BassBoost and setting the occlusion manager to -3. The client found the device very quiet re internal noise (completely silent in the booth) and experienced neither occlusion (due to the large vent) nor ampclusion (due to the extra large receiver). Feedback was also a non-issue. I turned down the MPO somewhat to prevent any noise induced damage. We experimented with various SoundRecover strengths (more or less frequency compression) and he was able to notice an improved clarity almost immediately superior to the several other devices we tried before.

Only time will tell how he adapts and how much additional speech discrimination he obtains as Phonak suggests adaptation could take up to 3 months or more to show a marked difference. Fortunately he is highly motivated and keen to try new hearing aid tech.

It is thus worthwhile trying some of these devices as long as they are flexible enough to be altered to suit your hearing and your professional takes due care to protect your existing hearing. The Phonak reps did mention that Phonak might be bringing out a less powerful device in the future that has SoundRecover specifically designed for severe high frequency losses. We will just have to wait and see.

most aids have expansion… if your loss goes up to 105
you might use Go pro power omni (oticon)… it is the only thing I could think…

Sometimes if you have normal hearing in the lower frequencies, you can hear the circuit noise of the aid.

Stronger hearing aids put out more circuit noise. The microSavia Art aids with the 0 to 75 dB range have a max gain of 44 to 45 dB, while the 211 with its range of 30 to 105 puts out 58 dB.

If you have more of a loss in the lower frequencies, you probably won’t notice the circuit noise, but if your hearing is better in the lows you might. You want to get the aid that best fits your audiometric configuration.

Some aids have a filter that reduces the output in quiet situations to take care of the circuit noise issue. Circuit noise also varies from one technology to another.

most aids out there have some sort of soft squelch or a expansion right?

Yes they do. Ed