Extremely Sensitive Ear Canal


#21

I wear ITE hearing aids everyday for at least 14 hours and have forgotten them when I went to bed and even once when taking a shower. We are all different and I am lucky to not have issues with my hard shell aids. I had more issues with soft domes always feeling that my aids were go to fall off


#22

Slight curve in receivers?.. Mine have two straight parts that meet at an angle, which is a step in the direction of curved receivers.

How big are yours?

I am trialing Oticon Opn mini-RITEs with the 85 receiver. The main body of the receiver is like a little bit of matchstick, about 4mm x 4mm x 8mm. But the output end is smaller, circular, and is angled relative to the matchstick. It’s 2-3mm long. The domes attach to the angled part.

I don’t have experience with other brands & models.


#23

^^^ OK. I just pulled out my right Phonak Audeo B-Direct aid. The matchstick part (labeled 2PX) is about 1/3" long, on top of which is the more slender “head” of 1/4" in length, topped with the - for lack of a better word - pancake on which the dome sits. That pancake part has the wax guard sitting like a crown on top of it, which is hidden under the silicone dome.

My receivers are arrow straight, and measure 1/3" + 1/4" in length. That’s not SHORT. And it’s not angled, so that’s why I keep getting these red sore areas in the wall of my CURVED canals.

Analogy: Drive an 18-wheeler into a 45-degree angle tunnel that’s no wider than the TRUCK. Result? Smashed wall in that tunnel.


#24

Oticon miniFIt Receiver;


#25

Maybe the balanced armature need to be straight for technical reasons, but I don’t see why the small hollow tube on the end (with a wax filter attached) can’t be pointed any which way.


#26

OTOH; the same manufacturer (Oticon) has their power receivers (also miniFit - 100 receiver’s) pointing dead-straight in-line. So I dunno.
ETA: also miniFit


#27

Well I’ll be jiggered!!! The tip of your receiver is indeed bent slightly. My Phonak receivers are stick-straight from top to bottom. Feh.


#28

I’m having the same huge, painful problem, 1Bluejay. I’ve given up on Phonak’s power receiver. It is a massive LOG, wider and longer that other receivers- but the others hurt too… I am at my wit’s end. Please continue to post what you find. I’m looking for a comfortable solution, too.


#29

How about a BTE? Seems like you wouldn’t have a receiver to deal with and their wouldn’t really be any constraints on the mold.


#30

I don’t really understand that. I use the Phonak Power receivers and they are smaller than the smallest dome. If the smallest dome is too large you could still have a custom mold and the power receivers, but maybe the BTE style would work better for you.


#31

Speaking for myself, I’ve gone that route twice now and had really bad allergic reactions to the plastic mold used.


#32

Hilary, I also tried out the Oticon Opn with 85 receiver on them (which I believe is one step below their largest - 100). That was the same long, hard matchstick as these Phonaks.

It could be that women have smaller ear canals … but whatever the reason, the unforgiving shape simply flies in the face of medical product ergonomics. I wonder if any manufacturers out there READ these boards?

Analogy: it’s a given that men’s hands, feet and body size is larger than women’s. Hence a size M sock will not fit men and women the same. Ditto other articles of clothing. Now, here’s a medical device of critical importance and the general consensus seems to be, “Ah whatever! Best we can do if we want to minimize cost.” Counter-intuitive.


#33

If you can use a silicone dome, do you think a silicone mold would still be a problem?


#34

^^^ Prooooooooobably not … but as one of us posted on a different thread, the silicon mold slides backwards out of the ear canal too! Who’d have thunk?

At least for now, I’m keeping my receivers IN the canal by putting a thin strip of 3M medical tape right over the wire, plastering it to my tragus. That way I don’t have to go the route of a custom mold … yet.


#35

Bluejay, we need to stay in touch. I’m in exactly the SAME situation. Both the Oticon 85 and Phonak’s power receivers drove me nuts, they hurt so much. We need to figure out a solution.
I see a nice private Audi on the 19th. I can’t go back to Costco for awhile, I’m too ashamed. I already returned the Bernafon Zerena’s and the Phonak Brio’s…


#36

Never, ever be embarrassed to return something. The merchant accounts for a certain percentage of returns in their pricing structure. If they didn’t want you to return them, they wouldn’t offer such a generous return policy.


#37

The Oticon miniFit 85 receivers do have a slight bend in the tube at the end. But if they still hurt your ears then this may not matter much to you;


#38

^^^^Waaaah! That so-called “bend” in the receiver is so minimal as to be unnoticeable to me! No wonder those hurt my ears. And of course the Phonak receivers are a sliver worse having no bend at all.

Question for manufacturers: Whose ear canals mimics the shape of these two boxy receivers in any way, shape or form?

Analogy: What if shoes were only sold in a box shape similar to this? Yes, they’d be super easy to mass produce, and one could put vibram soles on them for better traction, but … really?

Considering we pay like $6 grand a pair, don’t we deserve a pair of bespoke receivers where some time, care and finesse went into their manufacture?

If someone ever comes up with a way to truly customize hearing aids for comfort, no allergic reaction, functionality (i.e., not always slipping backwards out of the ear), I think they’d be on to something.


#39

Like. . . some sort of custom tip? :neutral_face:


#40

^^^That’s a good start! Even if we choose not to go the custom, hard-plastic, flesh-colored mold, you’d think by now there would be a better range of sizes for silicone double domes, f’instance.

I don’t know if folks realize that the generic double-domes sold at Amazon come in just TWO sizes: S/M and L. There’s no distinction between child, teen, adult, senior sized ear canals at all. To say nothing of the unique shape of the “meatus” (i.e., doorway to the ear canal.