Emotional after new HA’s


Acclimatization is definitely a big issue. You haven’t said what kind of HAs you’ve gotten. Some have automatic acclimatization programs that will gradually increase the level of the aids over a period of time, until they are working at their final, “target” gain.

But this is also something your dispenser or audiologist ought to know about. They should be able to help you out with this.


The brain is an amazing thing and when one of our senses is dulled or weakened the brain automatically compensates to an amazing degree. So when hearing aids suddenly eliminate or greatly reduce the need for compensation the brain will once again begin to adjust, but it’s a gradual process. Competent audiologist are fully aware of this so I encourage you to ask for help. Tell them exactly which sounds are the most irritating and adjustments will be made. With first time users the overall volume is usually set significantly lower during the break in period and gradually increased to the levels suggested by your hearing tests. And as others have suggested, you can further adjust things will the manual volume control for specific situations. Having improved hearing should be enjoyable from the start! Otherwise you’ll end up hating your hearing aids instead of loving them. I recommend turning them down any time things sound uncomfortably loud. It took me a few weeks of gradual increases and fine tuning, after living with impaired hearing for thirty years. For people with more severe hearing loss it often takes longer. Don’t torture your self. Ultimately you will most likely end up loving your improved hearing and wonder how you ever got by without hearing aids.


It’s getting better but I’m still struggling when driving and trying to think clearly. I’ve never had good hearing so after 39 years my brain is taking a while to work out what’s going on!

Made a bit of an error when cleaning the tubes and pulled the tube out of the earmold and now can’t get it all the way back in (!) so got to go back and get that sorted. Will speak to the audiologist then.

Not having the best of luck with this…


Reminds me of when I first got prescription glasses and could see that trees had individual leafs, not just green blobs similar to a child’s drawing. With my new HAs I was amazed I could now hear the microwave timer. I just had assumed it was defective.


I know what you mean about the semi-shouting. With me it’s seldom the sound level but rather the articulation. But that’s very difficult to explain to someone.


It’s difficult because they can hear fine :slight_smile: The b@$t@rd$. :slight_smile:


I had the same experience when I got new glasses at age 11. Who would have guessed that people could see individual leaves on trees across the quadrangle? My first HAs on the first day I began to wonder if people were just making lots of noise turning pages to annoy me. :relieved:


Before I got hearing aids my disability was taking quite a toll on my relationship with my wife. If I said, “what” she would repeat what she said, not more loudly or clearly, but just in a angry sounding voice! That got old really fast! But then I remembered my mom doing the same thing with my dad. I guess what goes around comes around…


We moved out to the country about six months before I got my HA’s. One of the first days we were outside with them in I said “Boy, we sure have a lot of birds here.” I never much heard them before.


Most audiologists start off new people at less than “full volume”. Then over the next few weeks will have you come in 2 to 4 times to slowly crank up the volume. This gives you a gradual awakening to hearing sounds.


Most new hearing aids can be set into increase gain slowly over weeks to months until targets are reached but there is something to be said for regular review to allow any other issues to be sorted.