Eargo Hearing Aids

Anyone used or heard anything about Eargo?http://eargo.com

I had never heard of it until I followed your link. It’s a nice website. With that being said, I would recommend you go to your local Costco instead.

Looks more like a PSAP for mild hearing loss. The price doesn’t say that though. I’d worry about it in noisy situations. It is more money than the Costco aid that would do much more. And, if you want in the ear aids, there are some several hundred dollars less than the Costco private label.

I have a pair of the Trax 42 on order. I agree they are too expensive for what they offer. Someone mentioned them on another forum.

this is looks like a rebadge version of the kick starter scam we saw a few months ago.

There’s a new review of them out: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2488793,00.asp

Of course, that review is written by someone without hearing loss, so although I’m sure they’re very comfortable, I don’t trust anything they say about the sound quality.

2 things that intrigue me about the Eargo

  1. Flexi-fibers. Using silicone fibers to adhere to the inside of the ears without plugging them up seems like a really good idea. I haven’t seen anything like this from other hearing aid manufacturers, and I hope I do soon!
  2. Rechargeable batteries: I haven’t seen any small CIC-type HAs with rechargeable batteries yet and it kind of drives me nuts. It’s such a common technology for every other consumer electronic device.
  3. How small are they? From what I’ve seen they look like CIC HAs, but it would be a lot more tempting if they were more like IICs-truly invisible instead of the “invisible from some angles, and only when they’re perfectly positioned” invisible that most CICs are.

Some potential issues I have, when comparing to a high-end CIC:

  1. There was no mention on the website if the two ears can automatically sync up, they seemed to emphasize that being able to switch each ear independently was a good thing, but for people withbilateral hearing loss there should be a way to have it automatically sync
  2. It wasn’t mentioned if the 4 programs would change automatically based on the environment, or if every switch was manual. I suspect everything is manual, which is a big point against it compared to the higher-end hearing aids that automatically adjust.
  3. There’s an option to have “custom programs” based on your audiogram for $500, but I don’t see that as being a great option. You always have to go back to your audiologist to tweak your hearing aid, and with this model, there’s no way to do that.
  4. There’s no option to program them yourself. I would really have liked that if this product was supposed to be a game-changer" or a “disruptor” that they would at least give you the option to download software to do some tweaks on your own.

Doesn’t look like much of a deal to me. That’s especially true of you blow the $500 to “program” them. Looks like they are built for the typical waterfall and not much good for something else. At $1980 or $2480, they cost more than KS6 or the Bernafon 7 that Costco sells. They are also in the range of some of the aids from the online sellers who include programming/testing.

Hi Everyone,
My name is Alex, and I work as an Acoustical Engineer for EARGO. I’m seeing a lot of questions about sound, features, etc. I’ve been here since we were prototyping the very first units. AMA!

I’ll answer any questions you might have - I have stay professional though!

  • Alex

Hi Alex,

Seems like a lot of questions were asked prior to your post but you did not respond to any of them. Why? Also, I have sent email via your website, lets see, 3 times without any type of response. Why? Also, why are they NOT available in Arizona. Geez, I can buy firearms, knives, even a Russian bride here but not your hearing aids. Why? And $500.00 additionally for programing, really? And I was told when I called Eargo that you had to buy them prior to having them programed. What’s up with that?
So, exactly what is your job? To answer or not to answer. Please make sure you read all the posts and reply. Thank you very much and have a nice day. :confused:
nelsonsrv

We’ve received some feedback from our users about the Eargo device on our page for Eargo Reviews. Scroll down to the bottom for comments.

From what I can tell, people aren’t too happy with the devices, or the service.

They will send you a free non-working model of the Eargo hearing aids. I did that and they are tiny. I tried one and it is not visible once in the ear and it did not move around at all once in the ear. The little fiber things really are a good idea. The power limitation would probably not work for me and they seem very expensive for what you get. Plus they want to charge another $500 just to program them.

I’m sure some will go for them just for the cosmetic appeal and I may take another look when there is a 2.0 or 3.0 with more power and features.

I’m new to this forum. I’ve seen the Popular Science mention of the Eargo and have been investigating it. It seems similar to the Able Planet hearing assistance device.
I saw the proverbial “red flag” go up when the Eargo web site described the device as FDA registered rather than FDA approved.
In my research, I also came across an apparently newer device called the Earlens. Rather than merely amplifying sound, it’s a BTE device and uses a laser and a transducer to directly move the ear drum. Surgery is not required, though custom fitting of - and direct contact with - one’s eardrum is.
The FDA recently approved it for marketing as a hearing aid.

FWIW, in my near-retired status, I find various kinds of work in the freelance world. That work sometimes includes writing, hence I see requests for some pretty off-the-wall assignments. Regarding online reviews, I’ve seen offers made where someone requests a number of “reviews” (up to 50) of a product to be written, either entirely new reviews, or re-wording of existing reviews. This has made me skeptical of online reviews in general. I always keep that experience in mind when reading online reviews of any product.

Caveat emptor.

The eargo is in the same price range as a real hearing aid from Costco that comes with a hearing test that sets the aid to your loss.

One thing I notices is there is no information on fit range or if they will work on a cookie bite hearing loss.

— Updated —

One thing I notices is there is no information on fit range or if they will work on a cookie bite hearing loss.

I am curious as to why Alex didn’t answer any of the existing question, that does seem a little odd.

— Updated —

I am curious as to why Alex didn’t answer any of the existing question, that does seem a little odd.

I considerate them, sent off for a sample to put in your ear, and then called and asked questions. The positive was that you couldn’t see them. Then big negative to me was the battery being sealed in the unit. You could charge them x number of times, but when the battery failed, and it would, it’s a throw away hearing aid. They had a warranty you could buy, but it was only good for 2 or 3 years (I don’t remember). I wasn’t impressed.

Hey All,

Thanks so much for the feedback and happy to address all of the questions on here. Please don’t hesitate to email us at social@eargo.com and put “forum” on the subject line and we’re happy connect.

— Updated —

Hey All,

Thanks so much for the feedback and happy to address all of the questions on here. Please don’t hesitate to email us at social@eargo.com and put “forum” on the subject line and we’re happy connect.