Deaf And Unemployed: 1,000+ Applications But Still No Full-Time Job

#1
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#2

Yes because it’s not 100% effective compare to normal people hence we will take more time to learn new things. Moreover things to setup technological environment like assistive device clean voice environment etc time and money more expenses by employer.rather employing experienced hard of hearing people they are hiring normal people with less experience. Law doesn’t compelling to take us on employment just if they employ and willing to continue to work with us only then obliged to give us assistive technology only. Wether to hire for long or short time or not to hire is up to employer

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#3

It’s troubling is to find how unevolved and uncompassionate we are as a society.

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#4

Wow. My heart just aches and goes out to these amazing, brave, and determined deaf folks looking for WORK. They are asking to be productive contributors to our society and not finding any kind of acceptance. Having walked in their shoes a bit myself - altho with hearing aids that at least kept me employable!! - I can still see both sides of the fence here.

It would be a good strategy to major in an area and find a job where hearing/speaking is not the primary action. One can do grant/proposal writing, or perhaps academic research or lab work that doesn’t require 80+% face-to-face time. So, a travel agent working at an airport ticket desk would NOT be a good idea. Nor would police work IF one’s life (or fellow workers’ lives) would be endangered with a physical disability. I gravitated to marketing, where I was able to do LOTS of writing & research, but I would not have felt comfortable in sales or positions where hearing and lots of public speaking was required.

Y’gotta be honest with yourself, too! I know that not all companies want to invest in the most basic of hearing-impaired devices to make things possible for a disabled employee. Then FORGET about them and move on. At the end of the day, you have to pay the bills and fend for yourself.

There is way too much bias, discriminiation and even ridicule for those considered “different” in our society, whether it be differences in physical, mental ability, or even the color of one’s skin, religious/political philosophies or whatever. I think for my own sanity, I’d have to focus on a positive, proactive strategy for picking a career.

That said, BOY am I glad to be retired. Ironically, my Phonak Marvel aids are far, FAR better than the old models I wore all the decades I worked. But I feel like I’ve paid my dues, and like a worn warrior, I’m enjoying a kinder, gentler life without these crushing worries.

Great article with very poignant insights …

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#5

majority members here are retired or near retiring and due to severity or type of loss able to do work moderately batter but days are changing. toddler/young folks getting hearing impaired and no place where artificial voice is not present. telephone, tv, speakers in conference, distance talk, group talk etc are headache for us. this is not restricted to particular country but its international issue now. no law present for accomodation. even normal people are reluctant to communicate by writing / speaking loudly / to come at particular low noise place / to use microphone.also education also not well developed to support hard of hearing people.
second opinion on work done which do not require talk they will be definitely be underpaid and lead single life in poverty surely i am 28 unemployed. i often getting job proposal were my entire salary expensed only during job time eg travel food etc so how i can afford HA insurance livelihood bread.

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#6

I have the same problem in Russia. “Your resume is very interesting! We will call you later.” Of course, no calls later because of my superpower hearing aids and overall deafness visibility. And no any assistive listening devices at my current work. Discrimination is clearly visible too - my colleagues LOVE to say to other direction than me.

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