Confused about Siemens Cielo

I feel that I am getting “the run around” by audiologists I have visited here. My audiogram is:
L: 250/15, 500/15, 1K/15, 2K/25, 3K/50, 4K/70, 6K/60, 8K/35
R: 250/10, 500/10, 1K/15, 2K/20, 3K/30, 4K/50, 6K/60, 8K/45
There is also a two tone continous ringing in my ears. I usually hear well in quiet environments but lose the ability to distinguish speech in small crowds, on the street and in larger rooms. This is affecting my work.
The only thing my audiologists have been able to agree on is open fit BTE. One audi says a fully automated 4 channel Cielo life will work fine (brochure says all Cielos have 6 channels) and that there aren’t many choices yet for open fit devices (my budget is max $1,300 per ear). A second audi says that people have trouble adapting to the Cielo life (too weak & slow to adjust) and presents me with a Cielo S. Difference in price between the two is $100.
A third audi doesn’t like Siemens and proposes a Phonak eXtra for about the same price.
What is going on here?:eek:

Geloin,

I have found that it is really difficult to weed out much of the technical jargan when dealing with "sales people".  Not that I'd compare Audiologist to used car salesmen, but the fact is these folks although must genuinely want to help, most are in business to sell hearing aids...  This is the way they make their living... Some are by nature aggressive, and have their favorites. They tend to "push" these over a simpler and sometimes more suitable brand/model...

It is the job (not always an easy one) of the client/customer/patient to ask questions and give the facts concerning their hearing… and make choices based on sound recommendations (no punn intended)…

One of the things I have found helpful is to write down a list of features that I have questions about & certainly include special conditions that I have trouble with and use the list to guide my decision. That way I’m not spending money for whistles and bells that I don’t need…

I also do enough research up front to at least understand the features being offered… This keeps me on track when I am presented with some of the glittery terms that I don’t completely understand…

Last, I’d ask for a long trial period to “Test drive” and adjust to the hearing aid… During the trial period I’d make regular visits for fine tuning and adjustments… Also ask to try out several models with some of the different features so that I can get a comparative idea of what is going to work best for me… If your Audi isn’t willing to work with you on these points, then I’d find one that will… develop a professional relationship with an Audi that you trust…

My Audi likes Audibel/Starkey & I tend to lean that way too probably more because of the relationship with my Audi, than the hearing aids themselves.

In short I not completely convinced that there are vast differences in brands… Certainly there are high end, top quality aids that cost a small fortune, but generally they share most of the same features with most other brands in comparative models…

I’m currently test driving the new Audibel hearstic (Open BTE)… Although there are a few minor problems that we are working on, my overall opinion is that this is a great aid… It’s small, light, and comfortable, and does a great job, and cost about $1200-$1500… I’m not convinced that this model is going to cover all of expectations, and I plan to try a couple of other models to see which one really works best…& I’m taking notes on each one…

Hope this helps
 Pat

Thanks for helping me confirm what I was suspecting already! This being my first hearing aids, I’m not sure what questions I’m supposed to ask and the audis here truly won’t divulge information freely. On top of this I’m having to do everything in two languages, so I can’t use the names of things I learn on the internet.

Just a suggestion, since this is your first set. I’d recommend that you try to keep the aid as simple as possible… It’s not always an easy road to travel… My first was a tough adjustment just to learn to get along with something inside my ear… & there are a bunch of adjustments just to the aid to get it tuned in… In my opinion keeping it as streamlined as possible makes the adjustment period much less stressful… & by all means don’t be afraid to speak up if it doesn’t sound right… Be patient and persistent…

Your first set should last 3-4 years with no problem without too much maintenance, then you can trade up to a set with some of the latest goodies…

I think that with all of the latest gadgets and digital tech the whole experience is a little like a visit to a carnival… Many don’t want to explain all the magic terms… That’s why I highly recommend you do plenty of research on the features of whatever brand you are considering…

Good luck & keep us posted
Pat

You know quite honestly if the audiologist / hearing instrument specialist cannot explain fully in a simple to understand way, then dump them and move on. As an H.I.S. myself I go to great lengths to ensure my patients understand what is going on and what choices are available to them. Those who do not do this are not doing their job, and are merely trying to make a sale, rather than help you with your problem.

As to your specific problem I agree with some of the comments made. Get a nice long test drive without cost or obligation. At least 30 days. Open fit should work well with this kind of loss.

My preference is for Starkey / Audibel. It’s the company I choose to work for because of the quality of the aids. Most hearing professionals will have a system they have come to prefer. Either though who their employer forces them to fit, or because they only know how to fit a certain kind of aid, and can’t be bothered to learn about other options. Although some have extensive experience with various brands and have found a favorite based on past success.

So if you question various experts, they will each have their own opinion as to which brand or model is best for you. A good first sign is if they actually carry some of the aids in stock and allow you to listen to them right after the test. Or at the very least are able to order some in for you to listen to in the office. If they can’t or won’t do that, keep looking. If the audiologists in your area can’t help seek out some hearing instrument specialists or vice versa.

I hope you find the right professional and the right system for your problem. Good luck!

I definitely agree that finding the right professional is the way to go… I’ve talked to several and at least twice I got the impression the Audi was trying to promote features that they didn’t completely understand… Although the HAs were of good quality, there is a lot more to understanding your hearing loss than a one size (or one model)…

To compound your difficulty it sounds like you’re also dealing with a language barrier… (I take it English speaking professionals are scarce in Poland)
None the less, most of the manufacturers have pretty decent websites that do a pretty good job of explaining their HAs… and their features…

It’s going to well worth your effort in the long run to do your homework…

& by all means take whatever time is necessary to find someone that can explain their recommendation in terms you can understand… Maybe even get a Polish speaking friend to go along to assist in the language and translation…

Thanks for all your advice, I really appreciate it!
I’ve found an audi carrying Oticons. She proposed the “Tego” model and has given me a try-out. But the right side often makes no sound and I only feel pressure. I noticed that the left HA simply says tego, while the right side says tego P. The audi said that everything is the same, only the right side is more powerful. On the ends of the tubes is a funnel like thing that goes into my ears and it totally plugs my ear canal. Are my problems with the right side due to occlusion or an actual difference in hearing aids?
In a few days I’ll switch ha’s and probably try the Delta model. There are 3 ratings for the Delta, 4,000; 6,000; 8,000. Which is suited to me?
As to the language barrier here, I was unclear. After 17 yrs here I am fluent in Polish. But often I can’t translate terms from the English on websites. A good example is the term “occlusion”; it should simply be “oklusja” according to grammatical rules, but I found out the hard way that the word is “sprężenie” which literally translates “spring-i-ness” or “compression.”
Have a good day!
G.