Bose Research: "Validation of a Self-Fitting Method for Over-the-Counter Hearing Aids"

Participants in the Self group reported better sound quality than did those in the Audiologist Best Practices group. In blind sound quality comparisons conducted in the field, participants in the Self group slightly preferred the parameters they selected over those selected by the clinician. Finally, there were no differences between groups in terms of standard clinical measures of hearing aid benefit or speech perception in noise. Overall, the results indicate that it is possible for users to select effective amplification parameters by themselves using a simple interface that maps to key hearing aid signal processing parameters.

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2331216519900589

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this I believe is very possible. The problem I have seen with so many hearing aids users, is that they believe that the way that Audis set the aids is the best the aids can be they do not keep after their Audis to get the aids that they pay so much for correctly fitted. Yes this can take a number of appointments and sometime taking a different road with the fitting of the aids. Let’s face it our Audis do not hear what we hear, all they can do is look at the audiogram and take their best guess. I also feel that at least for me due to my level of tinnitus that the audiogram is not that accurate. And the time of day the hearing test is done has a lot to do with the out come of the audiogram.

Very interesting subject. My self programming has proved to be at least equal to or better than the paid fitter.

I have on a couple occasions helped friends with aids. To fit someone other than yourself is very challenging. I have total respect for those in this profession. It takes both the fitter and the client working together as a team to do it well.

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I have been self programming my aids for almost 3 yrs, & am very happy with the results. I had a hard time describing to the audi what was wrong. The adjustments would always sound good in the office, but after a few days not so much?

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Yes they always do sound good in the office and change after a few days, that is due to our brains getting use to the sound changes. While I do not see myself programing my own aids, I would like the freedom of an app that I could make minor changes to the frequency levels, and to direction of the mics. And it would be great if I could maybe control soft speech when it happens to make it louder.

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Self programming is the only course for me. And even then, it isn’t easy. Every Audiologist I have ever seen has just programmed the aids for prescriptive loss, which doesn’t work in my case. Even after being told that it doesn’t work, that is what they did anyway. I still don’t have the hearing I think I could, and should have, but it is better than what an Audiologist has been able to do.

Issue with self programming is the relative difficulty of getting the hardware to configure it as well as their software not necc being end user focused.

This bose research also supports widex’s approach their A vs B machine learning interaction with the Evoke’s.

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Perhaps also due to the fact that the audiologist’s office is not exactly a realistic environment.

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