Average life expectancy of hearing aids

66m and looking to acquire my first pair of HAs. Also soon to be retiring. For premium HAs, what can I reasonably expect them to last on average before replacing them? Trying to anticipate what I need to budget for going forward. Thanks in advance for any advice.

4 to 5 years is a reasonable time span.

Beyond this hearing aids do work but can suffer from issues like apps that are discontinued and no longer function, warranty expiry - although there are general hearing aid repair companies that will service aids, not able to integrate with new technology because of no forward compatibility with new devices, such as mics etc - although the latter point is debatable as bluetooth could be fairly universal, but for proprietary technologies it could be definitely a problem - Phonak TV Connector etc.

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Yes I’ll go with that. The aids will probably still work but advances in technology during that time frame may make better aids available for your particular loss

My audiologist’s guidelines for replacement are 5 years typical, 3 years if you want the latest technology, and 7 years if you want to make them last. I suspect that rechargeable aids are too new to be factored into those numbers. Out-of-warranty battery and charger problems could complicate things.

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Well this is very subjective indeed, HAs last as long as you look after them, how long does a mobile device or other electronic device last, but really moisture is the biggest killer, HAs don’t just stop working after a certain amount of time, I have sets from 5 years to 15 and still all going strong, nothing wearing out as such, the receiver on RIC don’t last that long, but like a battery, very easy to replace.
Some people just have to have the “latest/greatest” device to be happy and others are happy with what works. One thing to remember is don’t believe all the manufacturer’s hype, a lot of exaggeration in most cases.

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I really like my new rechargeable aids I take good care of them and expected them to last for about 7 years. But, I didn’t take rechargeable batteries into account. that may effect the life span. Shoot! or maybe not. Maybe I can replace the batteries jsut before the warranty runs out (I think I got a three year warranty) Or maybe replacing the batteries is not that expensive…?

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Thanks everyone for your replies. 5 years seems like a good average for budgeting purposes. Makes sense that apps would no longer be supported and never thought about the rechargeable batteries

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5 years average with a lot of variability from person to person. It matters how well you clean and care for them, but your ear environment and work environment also matter. For some people, the acids in the oils on their skin just seem to wear hearing aids faster, or their ears are more moist or waxy. There are people who struggle to keep their hearing aids going even for a year and once their devices are out of warranty tend to re-buy, and there are others whose hearing aids keep going and going. I see more variability between people than between manufacturers–if your last set lasted 10 years, I expect your next set to last a while. Harder to know with your first set.

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I’m not so sure about this, my old ReSound linx2 are still supported on the smartApp, in fact there was an update just recently, these are 2016 models, I would expect a few more years, in fact,so long as I don’t update the app, they will work with the app for as long as the HAs keep working.

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Yes, Many places will either replace batteries or give you new hearing aids if returned near end of warranty. Oticon’s are fairly easy to replace (doable by audiologist) and about $100 apiece. Factory charge for other brands out of warranty tends to be about $250 apiece, or $500 for the pair.

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I had a pair of Starkey aids from 2007. I used it over 8 years. Starkey told me that they will not repair Starkey aids that are 8 years or older because of changing technologies. To prolong the life of hearing aids, use a hearing aid dryer and don’t wear it during the rain.

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Just my opinion… I am dead in the water without working hearing aids. Considering the cost of out of warranty repairs, I tend to replace aids at the end of the warranty / repair period. By then, technology has changed anyway. Near the end of warranty period I have aids serviced and they suffice as replacements when newest aids are away receiving warranty service. It has worked so far. Out of warranty repair cost seem unreasonable and drive users to new aids, which I am certain is intended. My current aids have a five year warranty which is unusal. My current aids have gone one year without repairs which is a new record for me since 1990. Just my opinion.

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My older set of Phonak’s are 16 years old and are actually still working.

Just don’t wear them as technology has massively improved.

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I keep it reasonably clean and store it in a dryer box. I keep visiting hearing aids professional for routine maintenance.

I have 2 sets of hearing aids. The newer one was 2018 and the older was like 2008. I keep occasionally cycle of use between it. Keep it running on a fresh battery 1-2 times per month so the capacitor, amp and chip don’t die from out of electric running for too long.

My old 2008 hearing aids still work good. That’s 14 years in total?

If you keep it good, it’s going good with you.

I purchased my aids sometime at the end of 2020, however for me, I’d say I’m in a cycle of replacing every 3 to 5 years. Reasons being:

If I replace it at the 3 year mark - I’ll be able to get an extra $1,000 off the cost of a pair of hearing aids through my government’s assistive devices plan, or $500 per side.
If I replace it at the 5 year mark, my insurer will pay 90% of the cost of the hearing aids, and I’ll also get the $1,000 towards them too.

However - There are many people who NEED the hearing aids and can’t do anything without them, so YMMV.

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It’s very useful to have back-ups, this is good practice.

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I would say on average I replace my cell phone every 3 or 4 years (maybe even a bit longer than that) and my aids about twice as long. I’ve been using batteries, not rechargeable ITE styles. They all take a bit of wear and tear over the years.

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I’ve been wearing HAs for 19 years. My 4th pair is 5 months old. Replaced first pair after 5 yrs because lost one. I think it’s like cars. I get attached and will drive one 10 years. I replaced last pair after 4 years when hearing ability diminished noticeably even though my hearing had not worsened much. HA technology does improve over time so I won’t wait more than 4 years again. The price is expected to drop with the new availability of OTC aids. They are a bargain at any price! Sometimes I have to touch them to see f I’m wearing them because they seem so natural to me. Started out wearing 2 hrs a day and I was comfortable within 2 weeks. Open fit are the most comfortable to me and give best hearing experience. HAs help, they don’t “perfect” hearing the way glasses help vision. I used ENT associated audiologists for first 2 pairs, but am OK with Costco now.

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:thinking: 45 dB at 500 Hz :thinking: :thinking:

Thems fightin’ words. :laughing:

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My resounds are 11 year old! but,they do not make that model anymore,if it works don’t renew them that is resounds quote! they are now my back ups,

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