Audiology Report and Questions

Audiometric testing results indicate a mild, dropping to moderately severe high frequency MHL right, and a moderate to moderately severe SNHL left. Sp rec is excellent right and fair left. Tymps WNL bilaterally. Acoustic reflexes are elevated ipsi left in comparison to ipsi right.

Given the above I was directed to see an ENT before she proceeded with an HA fitting. Her concern was the left ear based on my SRT performance, the elevated ipsi, and the fact that my tinnitus seems louder in my left ear than my right. But that is only true in day to day activities. When there is noise–conversation, TV, radio etc. it is more distinct in the left. In silence the rt and lft are indistinguishable.

So why the ENT? Is there anything in that chart that would indicate something other than typical age related hearing loss?

Firstly, I am not an audiologist or HIS. But I would say that the MHL probably stands for mixed hearing loss - in other words there is a conductive component on that side. There is a difference between air and bone conduction. That would probably score you a trip to the ENT on its own. Also the left and right results are different and that will also usually mean a referral to an ENT. Best to get checked out and see if there is anything that can be done before you proceed with hearing aids.

MHL IS mixed hearing loss. And yes I already have an appointment with an ENT today.

I am also not an audiologist. I had on one of my many audiograms the same type of results. When there is a difference between conductive and air hearing loss of more than 10 db, that means a trip to the ENT. They will be looking to confirm the difference between air and conductive hearing loss. They may want an MRI to rule out an aural neuroma (ana). This is when a benign tumor grows near the aural nerve system and compresses it. Very rare, but they will want to eliminate that as the cause of the difference between bone and air conduction. They would also be looking at the mechanics of the ear to make sure that all is well (stapes, etc. are functioning normally).

Thanks Brad. My sister had a pencil eraser sized acoustic neuroma. She went in for testing as she was experiencing a very loud tinnitus in her right ear. Nothing in her left. It was monitored and found to be growing at an unacceptable rate and so was removed with gamma knife surgery. She lost about 70% of her hearing on the right side.

Saw the ENT this afternoon. Same concerns as the Au. D. Disparity between the two sides and the poor speech recognition scores indicating more going on than just volume. Asked if I had ever been exposed to damaging noise on the left side and of course I don’t remember. At any rate I’m scheduled for an MRI next Tuesday to rule out Acoustic Neuroma. What fun this is. Old man time is a mean old man.

Alrighty then. Had my MRI review today with the ENT and there is nothing unusual on it (other than a large empty space between the ears) and most importantly no acoustic neuroma. So I’ve been given the green light and Thursday I have a fitting and I’m wondering what that will entail? The center handles five of the six major manufacturers (no Resound) and so I should be able to give a listen to each of them. Any advice? Any suggestions? What should I expect?

my recommendation still stands.

They will probably make a recommendation and try to get you to buy right then. Make sure you know what the terms of the trial period are and the terms of a return, if it becomes necessary. I doubt you will listen to more than two brands.

Leave your wallet at home

LOL. Well I’m fortunate in that respect, money is not an issue. I am in the habit of getting what I want and any attempted sales pressure to buy a particular brand will end in a very quick termination. On the other hand I do want intelligent details of the strengths and weakness of each particular brand and if there is a particular one suggested I am going to want to know why and what advantages it offers over the others.

Right now I’m leaning toward the Alta2 Pro.

Expect them to put the most expensive aids in your ears, and expect the hard sell.

So far, you have been dealing with this from a medical perspective, with the ENT and the MRI and such. You have been dealing with people who care about your health. Now you move into a new realm; sales. Be aware that this is a whole new ballgame. Do not assume these people want what’s best for you anymore, they now want to make the most profit they can. That may sound like exaggeration, maybe they do care some about what’s best for you, but if you go into it with the mindset that they are car salesmen, you’re less likely to be taken advantage of.

Find out the trial period and restocking fee up front. Costco gives 90 days 100% money back. My HIS offered 15 days no money down, but when I ran into issues he extended that a week. Once I purchased, the state mandated 30 days $300 restocking fee. From what I read here most businesses offer 30 days $300 restocking fee.

Also find out what is included in the price. You can buy hearing aids dirt cheap on the internet, but that’s because all you’re buying is hearing aids and perhaps the initial programming. What you’re audi should be selling you is a service. My HIS offers free batteries for life, free accessories, free adjustments, everything. I paid him once and he never asks me for money again until I want new aids.

So, what to expect on Thursday? They are going to take your audiogram, program it into the hearing aids, and put them in your ears. At that point you will hear all kinds of sounds you haven’t heard in years. I think you’ve been doing a lot of research, so hopefully you understand the concept of brain re-training. If not say so, and you’ll get a lot of good explanations here.

Find out if your audi does Real Ear Measurement. I think that’s very important.

You should be able to give a listen to each of them, but that doesn’t mean you will. It depends on what kind of agreements they have with each of those manufacturers. If you want to give a listen to each of them, you will probably have to insist on that. Even so, it probably won’t make much of a difference. Five minutes with a hearing aid is not a valid test drive. You need at least a couple of weeks. It actually can take up to two months to become accustomed to hearing aids, but a couple of weeks should identify any serious problems with a particular brand.

Different brands also offer different features. Do you have any connectivity needs; smartphone, pc, tv? Hearing aids come with volume control and numerous programs (Noisy Environment, Music, etc). Would you rather use a remote, an app, or the controls on the aids themselves?

Give us an idea of your lifestyle; active or sedentary? Movies, concerts, swimming, sports, large gatherings?

Gosh, I could say a lot more, but I think I’m starting to babble.:rolleyes:

Congratulations, that was an excellent summary of what you need to know when purchasing hearing aids. I don’t think you were babbling at all.

Expect them to put the most expensive aids in your ears, and expect the hard sell.

First I intend to buy the top aid in whatever brand I end up with. I’ll make that known up front and remove it from the equation. They are not going to have to push me buy up.

Second just a bit about me. I am technologically savvy and devour information. I manage multi-multi million dollar projects, live on a diet of engineering, scheduling and financial issues, often confrontational, and am basically immune to pressure. I appreciate open and candid discussions; I expect professional, intelligent answers from professional people who are supposed to know those answers and have little patience when they don’t. And I have a very sensitive BS meter. When it is pegged I’m done.

So far, you have been dealing with this from a medical perspective, with the ENT and the MRI and such. You have been dealing with people who care about your health. Now you move into a new realm; sales.

Right. I’ve done my homework there as well. There were no flags raised on my first visit; questions were answered without hesitation, and I don’t expect to have any tomorrow.

Find out the trial period and restocking fee up front.

I have but that is the least of my concern. Competence is my primary concern. Money is down on the bottom of the list.

I paid him once and he never asks me for money again until I want new aids.

That is excellent.

So, what to expect on Thursday? They are going to take your audiogram, program it into the hearing aids, and put them in your ears. At that point you will hear all kinds of sounds you haven’t heard in years.

I am actually excited about that aspect and can’t wait.

Find out if your audi does Real Ear Measurement.

They do. BTW I have spoken in private with 2 HI Specialists and asked what I ought to expect from my provider. One of them is a regular here and his input has been extremely helpful and the other is a personal friend where I would go if he were not 1,000 miles away. Both are very very similar in what they said. Both are fans of Oticon Alta2. The second choice would be the Phonak Audeo V90. So I will start there. If the Alta doesn’t work out—but I suspect that it will—I try the Phonak.

You should be able to give a listen to each of them, but that doesn’t mean you will. It depends on what kind of agreements they have with each of those manufacturers. If you want to give a listen to each of them, you will probably have to insist on that.

I believe they have demo units in all the brands they carry–5 of the big 6.

Different brands also offer different features. Do you have any connectivity needs; smartphone, pc, tv? Hearing aids come with volume control and numerous programs (Noisy Environment, Music, etc). Would you rather use a remote, an app, or the controls on the aids themselves?

I’ll get all the goodies that are available. I don’t have a problem with remotes that sit between the HA and the smart phone. Direct connect between the phone and HA would be nice but it is not high on the list.

Give us an idea of your lifestyle; active or sedentary? Movies, concerts, swimming, sports, large gatherings?

Meetings. Biking. Meetings. Season tickets to the symphony. Meetings. Boating. Meetings. Lots of time on phones and computers. Meetings. Wrestling with the grand kids. Meet…well you get the picture.

Gosh, I could say a lot more, but I think I’m starting to babble.

Not at all. I enjoyed it. The technical aspects I can research. It’s the experience of the persons here that interest me. And I think I’ve read most of the threads you’ve contributed in. All very helpful by the way. Thanks for taking the time to share.

Yeah, it was kind of a euphoric experience for me. I am still in amazement as I listen to the sounds I was missing. My wife was looking at me like I had three heads yesterday because I was walking around the house clapping my bare feet on the floor tiles, just to listen.

Different brands also offer different features. Do you have any connectivity needs; smartphone, pc, tv? Hearing aids come with volume control and numerous programs (Noisy Environment, Music, etc). Would you rather use a remote, an app, or the controls on the aids themselves?

I’ll get all the goodies that are available. I don’t have a problem with remotes that sit between the HA and the smart phone. Direct connect between the phone and HA would be nice but it is not high on the list.

That’s cool that you have the opportunity to go all out, I’m very happy for you.:cool: And I mean that sincerely.

As far as a remote that sits between the HA and the smart phone, you may want to just look at how the different brands accomplish that. I know you’re leaning toward the Oticon, and if I recall correctly, I wasn’t to keen on their bluetooth device. Costco’s Phone Clip+ (which is the same as Resound I think) seemed okay to me. I ended up with Siemens and the EasyTek, which I’m real happy with. This probably wouldn’t be a make or break kind of thing, but just one more thing to look at as you decide between brands.

Give us an idea of your lifestyle; active or sedentary? Movies, concerts, swimming, sports, large gatherings?

Meetings. Biking. Meetings. Season tickets to the symphony. Meetings. Boating. Meetings. Lots of time on phones and computers. Meetings. Wrestling with the grand kids. Meet…well you get the picture.

Well, your certainly going to find the meetings more enjoyable. Meetings…enjoyable? Hmmm…more tolerable! Yeah, that’s what I mean! I’m certainly nowhere near your level on the totem pole, but I did volunteer for a position recently that has me facilitating bi-monthly meetings. I realized after the first one that I never could have done this without the aids.

Symphony caught my eye. I haven’t been to the symphony yet, but I have seen one movie. My HIS told me to request a device from the theater to connect to their loop. I decided to pass on that and just see how it went, and it went just fine. But I have heard people on here saying they have had trouble at the symphony. There might be a chance you need a special program setup in the aids for that.

Biking (sweat) and Boating (water), make sure the aids are rated for water exposure.

Wrestling with the grand kids, take 'em out!:smiley:

Gosh, I could say a lot more, but I think I’m starting to babble.

Not at all. I enjoyed it. The technical aspects I can research. It’s the experience of the persons here that interest me. And I think I’ve read most of the threads you’ve contributed in. All very helpful by the way. Thanks for taking the time to share.

No problem, I enjoy it.

I can tell you’re a pretty sharp guy. And I’m probably discussing a lot of the technical aspects aren’t I? Well, I am a technician after all!

Personal experience? Didn’t care for my first audi, she was cold and impersonal, never really discussed options with me. On the advice of folks here I found a new HIS, one who felt more like a partner in my hearing solution, and I am very happy with the results. Sounds like maybe you’ve got that part nailed.

Had a problem with my domes backing out, that’s a whole other thread. Solved that with custom molds, which is still a work in progress.

Lastly,the new sounds can be overwhelming. I don’t know if they all do this, but my HIS said he would start me out at 70% amplification, and gradually increase it on subsequent visits. One week later, I think he saw a determination in me, and decided to go full amplification. Everything was really loud. But I was indeed determined. I put them in when I wake up, and take them out just before I climb in bed. Everything is finally starting to sound normal to me. I get the feeling you’re kind of this way too.

Thanks Brad, I appreciate that.:cool:

Well, your certainly going to find the meetings more enjoyable.

Meetings and enjoyable are two words that should never be used in the same sentence. I hate them. Even the ones I run.

but I did volunteer for a position recently that has me facilitating bi-monthly meetings.

I attend meetings because I have to. If I am able to avoid them I avoid them. Volunteering for a meeting is a totally alien concept. :stuck_out_tongue:

Symphony caught my eye.

Yeah that one is pretty high on my list. I have had some suggest Tcoils but I’m not sure what they might do to building acoustics. Great acoustically tuned buildings, like Orchestra Hall in Detroit, actually contribute to the sound of an orchestra and I don’t know if telecoils preserve that. Actually I don’t know what the HAs are going to do either. I worry a bit about this one.

Biking (sweat) and Boating (water), make sure the aids are rated for water exposure.

Yep, read some of the threads here on that and a dryer is on the list.

Wrestling with the grand kids, take 'em out!:smiley:

I had an idea that might be the answer.

I can tell you’re a pretty sharp guy.

Wait a minute while I go get my wife. I want her to read that. LOL

Sounds like maybe you’ve got that part nailed.

I think so. Time will tell.

Had a problem with my domes backing out, that’s a whole other thread. Solved that with custom molds, which is still a work in progress.

I read about that with a great deal of interest.

Lastly,the new sounds can be overwhelming. I don’t know if they all do this, but my HIS said he would start me out at 70% amplification, and gradually increase it on subsequent visits. One week later, I think he saw a determination in me, and decided to go full amplification. Everything was really loud. But I was indeed determined. I put them in when I wake up, and take them out just before I climb in bed. Everything is finally starting to sound normal to me. I get the feeling you’re kind of this way too.

If there is one single thing that I’d have to pick as being the most valuable from reading in the forum is that it has helped temper my expectations. The many and various experiences that people have been willing to share, especially initial problems and eventual resolutions, reading as they work through them, are really, really helpful.

Hearing loss runs in the family on my dad’s side. Every one of his siblings had hearing loss so I knew this day was coming. He, and they, refused to do anything about it and i vowed not to make that same mistake. He has Alzheimer’s now and the connection between hearing loss and dementia scares the hell out of me.

I decided to pull the trigger when I found I couldn’t understand my youngest grandkids when no one else was having trouble. That and little disagreement I had with my wife while sitting out on the porch. The red wing blackbirds were kicking up a bit of a fuss and I got up to take a look. I stepped over to the rail and looked off to the right. They’re to the left she said. Now way said I. But she was right. So I stuck my finger in right ear and the sounds were gone. So was the rustling of the leaves in the trees and the sound of the wind. That was it. I knew the time was here.

Thanks for talking. It’s been my pleasure.

So I decided to call my insurance provider today just to see what they covered. I was surprised. I got a very friendly lady who detailed the entire extent of my coverage and who I may use. I may use anybody I want, for any brand I want and they cover up to $2,500.00 no questions asked. Warranties, batteries, trial periods and so forth are subject to the conditions set by the provider and manufacturer. But if I use a center that is partnered with Amplifon they include a 3 year warranty, add in free batteries for the warranty period and a no restocking fee trial period. I got the names of two of their partners close to home and gave them a call. Naturally they wanted to push Amplifon. Second choice was Phonak who were OK but not as good as Amplifon. What about Oticon I asked? One said they were decent but he didn’t deal with them. The other said they were backwards, technologically inferior and the only source he knew around this area selling them was St Joseph Mercy Hospital hearing center in Ann Arbor. Now I personally know of at least 10 because I researched.

So I asked exactly what it was about Oticon that qualified them as technologically inferior? Well, says he, they are backwards. Yes you already said that but what about their technology makes them that way. Since you prefer Amplifon and Phonak what makes them technologically superior? Well says he, Phonak is the biggest supplier in the world. Ah, says I, market share is indicative of technological superiority? Thanks for your time.

Amplifon? Pffffffffft!

But I did find out I get $2,500.00 of insurance toward my instrument of choice. I actually thought I got zip.

Just to be clear, Amplifon isn’t an actual hearing aid brand. They’re a hearing healthcare provider network that offers discounts. You can get all of the major brands through them, but Siemens is their preferred supplier.

OK. When the one individual said he preferred their brand I assumed it was Amplifon. And the one was pushing Phonak. Siemens wasn’t mentioned. But I went to their website and there is an Amplifon brand, just not available in the US.

OK this is edited for more detail. When I called the two clinics I had read in the Ampliphon website and saw that Ampliphon was labeled as their flagship brand. I didn’t read the second line qualifying the countries in which they were available. Here is the link

http://www.amplifon.com/English/Consumers/brand/Pages/default.aspx

So when I called the two providers that were closest I assumed they carried Ampliphon. I also had not identified myself as one calling about Ampliphon services. Again I just assumed it. So after I read rasmus I called the first provider back mentioning Ampliphon. I was told they did work with them but that I was to contact Ampliphon directly and have them make the appointment for me. Brands? They had several but recommended Siemens. I did not call Mr. Oticon is backwards a second time.