A Pet Peeve of mine


#1

Perhaps most of you frequent higher class establishments but I really hate it when they call out either a number or your name to pick up an order (usually there is loud, distracting music to contend with as well). Often I just don’t hear the call and when I finally go to check the order is sitting there cold and soggy. Any suggestions of how to deal with this?


#2

Maybe ask them not to cross out all the letters in the words?


#6

I’m with you. I agree. In expectation of probably not being able to hear the call…I think I probably hover around the hand-out area just so I CAN see and hear something so that it doesn’t sit there.

I suspect all classes of people go to coffee shops on occasion.


#8

#9

Initially closed this, but leaving it open for now to give it a chance to get back on track. Fixed the text cross through issue on the op.


#10

If and when I do go to places like you mentioned where it’s noisy and I have an order to pick up I just tell the staff I am hard or hearing beyond immediate face to face so wont hear calls due to noise, can you signal me with a sign or come and tap me on arm. Usually most places have accommodated my request its the only solution I’ve found that works if I have company most know to listen for me and let me know. Wish I could give you better ideas but that’s the method ive always used.


#12

LoubyLou has it right, Member 98. Spread the area of concern. Let people know how they can help you, and most people will do it quite happily. “Hard of hearing” is not an immediately visible condition. When I travel alone by air, and check in on line, I check “DEAF” in the box that asks if I need boarding assistance. The first time I saw 'DEAF!!!" on my boarding pass, I felt a twinge of…I don’t know: vulnerability, maybe? But I got over myself, and found airline personnel to be most discreet and helpful. Be of good cheer, and let others know how help. All the best to you.


#13

I have this issue as well, only with me it’s not food, but building permits. There are places where they call next in line without amplification while sitting below counter level. This is so frustrating I have taken to standing at the counter instead of sitting and keeping an eagle-eye on all the front line staff. Being a building department, they don’t make any accommodations, either, you take it or leave it, they don’t care.


#14

To All that have posted on this thread: I just love these Forums! I have learned SO much. I joined back in 2011 before it was Hearing Tracker, when I got my first pair of HAs (Unitron Moxi). I don’t know why I stopped reading posts, wish I had continued all these years. I was totally ignorant. I let myself be talked into new HAs (never was happy with the first), when the Technician suggested it. I now believe it was because my insurance would pay some every 3 years. I never did like him. Stereotypical, (olden days) used car salesman. Company took on a different name, new location, new tech, I liked her. However after much talk and adjustment, I still was very unhappy with the 2nd purchase (Phonak Audeo B70). So, in January this year I was again entitled to insurance help on a new pair. I trialed two. First was (Phonak Audeo B90-R). Really liked them. BUT, decided to trial the Unitron rechargeables, just to compare. Disaster. Not only did I hate them, the poor tech couldn’t improve the experience any. I no longer had any confidence in her. Although I had liked the B90s, I was pretty sure she was inexperienced and just did what the computer told her in response to my complaints. So, I did what Ken P. had suggested. Went to Wash U Audiology here in St. Louis.(TY Ken P.! also MDB for all the answers to my questions!) Back to Wash U: A REAL Audiologist! Hearing test. REM! Recommended custom molds.(had tried both closed and open domes of different sizes. Unsatisfactory. The vents of the molds were too small = occlusion. New molds with enlarged vents. Much better all in all. I still have issues. Can’t handle groups of people with more than one talking. Busy restaurants. Still going up and down on the volume. Often leaning way forward to read lips. As soon as I am sure what I want help with, going to contact that Audi again. Unfortunately, no free help as I didn’t buy my aids from them, so want my next visit to be worthwhile. I’ll make a list to take with me. Still reading new posts every day. Still getting educated.

I know this post is waaaaaaaaay too lengthy. I have been waiting for the right time to jump in and post again. I figure this “Social” forum is the right place.

Thank you all so very, very much!

Carol


#15

Tell them you have hearing issues and will probably not hear them when they call your name, number, etc. so they will have to do something to get your attention.


#16

It causes me anxiety as I know that hearing numbers or even my last name shouted out in a crowd, I could miss hearing it. At airports the boarding order is usually done by a person speaking not clearly into a speaker with a lot of crowd noise mixed into it. Its amazing how many times I have to ask someone for help.


#17

That causes me anxiety too, especially in a crowd


#18

At the airport go up to the person at the gate who actually announces the boarding and tell them you have hearing issues and can’t hear them and they will make accommodations for you. Basically boils down to the “squeaky wheel gets the grease!” The same thing can be done at restaurants or anyplace that they call your name.


#19

Most places with ques here(Thailand) have you take a number from a machine and then post the number of next person to be seen on a video screen above the window. Saves having to provide multiple language announcements and certainly helps me.


#20

That brings up another peeve of mine. In addition to being hard of hearing, I also suffer with recruitment. Why is it that so many places these days have music blaring, usually way too loud. Why is it considered necessary or desirable at all? I yearn for the classic restaurants in the old movies frequented by stars like Spencer Tracy and Katherine Hepburn.


#21

I treat this situation like most. I take steps to make sure I can hear what I need to hear when I need to hear it. I don’t expect a place of business to change their order delivery process just for those of us with hearing disabilities, so I make sure I can hear. I pay attention to the flow of people, orders, and information.


#22

Oh man. That IS another good peeve. I believe I also have some level of recruitment. Although I’m not sure general noise brings it out. Sudden louder-ish sounds yes.
But yeah. Crap. Noise everywhere. And music. But y’know…we’ve had musak for like ever. Same question. Why is the noise needed?
And music overwhelming the dialog on tv. Heck my better hearing/better half (how about BHBH? :slight_smile: ) is bothered by that. I think I’m on to something with going to the bother of the 5.1 system. I haven’t yet tried actually disconnecting the surrounds but the dialog primarily in the center does seem to improve the listening experience. Not what the intention of 5.1 was but hey it seems to work for the noise and music to be put to the background where it belongs.


#23

And don’t even get me started on perfume and aromas everywhere! This sensitivity no doubt has no relationship to recruitment or hearing disability, but there are certain stores I have a hard time going into because of the smell (Bed, Bath, and Beyond is a prime offender, but there are many others).


#24

You can thank Dolby for this one. Before Dolby sound the people doing the sound for movies were kind of kept in the background, today they basically take over the movie or TV show with their constant background noise that drowns out the dialog. As to stores blaring music it’s probably because someone sold it to someone telling them it would give their shoppers a more pleasurable shopping or eating experience.


#28

Is this MIC SHU, IM BACK, Uncle Larry, Doc Jake? If not you sure give answers like he did.